Part of: Infectious Diseases and Pandemics

Related to: Teenage ConceptionsContraception, Children and Young People, Sexual Orientation

In 2015 a new Bath & North East Somerset Rapid Sexual Health Needs Assessment was completed.  Download the full 2015 B&NES Rapid Sexual Health Needs Assessment.

The information gained from this SHNA will be utilised to improve the sexual health of the population of B&NES and inform the development of an updated Sexual Health Strategy (currently open for consultation until 11th October 2015) and Action Plan for the area.  It will also ultimately support future commissioning, service planning and service design.

Key Facts (from the 2015 B&NES Rapid Sexual Health Needs Assessment)

  • B&NES is a low prevalence area for HIV, with 0.66 infections per 1,000 population aged 15-59 years, compared to 2.1 per 1,000 in England.
  • Although data is limited, it appears that from 2012–2013 the overall rate of chlamydia diagnoses increased (from 328 per 100,000 population to 351 per 100,000 population), with the number of diagnoses in males dropping from 411 per 100,000 population to 242 per 100,000 population) and the number in females increasing (from 232 per 100,000 to 454 per 100,000 population).
  • Although data is limited , it appears chlamydia detection rates in B&NES are below the recommended rate of 2,300 chlamydia diagnoses per 100,000 15 to 24 year olds , averaging 1,607 per 100,000 in 2013 compared to 1,907 per 100,000 in the Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire PHE centre area and 2,016 per 100,000 in England.
  • B&NES is a low prevalence area for gonorrhoea (27 per 100,000 in B&NES compared to 55 per 100,000 in England), genital herpes (38 per 100,000 in 2013, compared to 60 per 100,000 in England) and genital warts (123 per 100,000 compared to 137 per 100,000 in England).
  • In 2013, B&NES had a very low incidence of syphilis, consistent with the national picture (5 per 100,000 compared to 6 per 100,000 in England).  The majority of diagnoses during 2010 to 2013 occurred  in Gay and Bisexual men, mirroring national trends.
  • B&NES has a low level of under 18 conceptions, and low level of Teenage Conceptions when compared to statistical neighbours.
  • B&NES has a lower rate of abortions than both the regional and national comparators (12.7 per 1,000 women aged 15-44, compared to 14 per 1,000 women aged 15-44 in the South of England, and 16.1 per 1,000 women aged 15-44 in England).

What does the community say?

The Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey 1

The Health-Related Behaviour Survey developed by the Schools Health Education Unit (SHEU) is designed for young people of primary and secondary school age. The surveys have been developed by health and education professionals, and cover a wide range of topics. Data arising from the survey can be used to help inform planning and policy decisions as well being used in the classroom as the stimulus for discussion with young people. These surveys are carried out every two years.

When considering the results of the Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey in B&NES it is worth bearing in mind the level of participation in the survey, and thus how representative the responses are likely to be of children in B&NES as a whole. For more information see the Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey section in Children and Young People

The Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey in 2013 asked secondary school children in B&NES in year 8 and 10 a number of questions about sex and sexual health and education.

When the year 10 secondary school children in B&NES were asked If they had ever had sex and what age did they first have it:

  • 17% of pupils responded that they have had sex.
  • Of the 194 pupils who had had sex, 66% said they were 14 years old or younger when they first did so.

When the secondary school children in B&NES were asked at what age do you think sex education should start:

  •  9% of the pupils that responded said that they thought sex education should start in Year 4, while 26% thought it should start in Year 5.
  • 40% of the pupils that responded thought that sex education should start in Year 6, while 25% thought it should start in Year 7 or Year 8.

When the secondary school children were asked who or what would be the first source of help or information they would go to in relation to sexually transmitted diseases/ infections:

  • 28% said they would go to their family
  • 20% said they would go to a doctor, Nurse, other health worker
  • 15% said they would go to no one
  • 11% said they would go to their friends
  • 2% said they would go to someone at school
  • 2% said they would go to the internet

State of Play: findings from the England Gay Men’s Sex Survey 2014

This survey is a community-recruited study of Gay Men and comprised of 15,360 qualifying responses in 2014. It covers HIV and STI infections, sex between men, HIV prevention needs and service uptake. For more information about health needs specific to the LGB&T community please see Sexual Orientation

Headline findings:

  • The proportion of men not happy with their sex lives was 41%, and was similar in all parts of the country.
  • 9% of the survey cohort were living with diagnosed HIV infection. Among these, 81% were on anti-HIV treatment.
  • 61% indicated they had anal sex without a condom in the last 12 months.
  • 42% of men with diagnosed HIV felt that alcohol or drugs had contributed to their acquiring HIV, with drugs now being as commonly implicated as alcohol.
  • 52% of respondents had used illicit drugs in the last 12 months, the most common being cannabis (26%), cocaine (17%) and ecstasy (15%).
  • 50% did not know that ‘Doctors in the UK recommend that all men who have sex with men test for HIV at least once a year’.
  • 37% had never heard of Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) as a means to reduce HIV infection risk

To read the full report please click here

  • 1. Schools Health Education Unit (2013) The Health-Related Behaviour Survey 2013, A report for BANES Secondary, Bath and North East Somerset Council