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Related to:  Major Causes of Mortality, Socio-economic Inequality, Ill Health and Disability, Food Poverty

Key Facts

  • The gap between life expectancy of males living in the least and most deprived areas (by decile) has increased over time in B&NES - READ THE EXECUTIVE BRIEFING NOTE ON THIS ISSUE.  This is due to rising life expectancy over time for males living in the least deprived areas of B&NES, while at the same time there has been little or no change in the life expectancy over time for males in the most deprived areas of B&NES.
  • Life expectancy in B&NES is 81.3 for men and 84.7 for women, higher than regional and national averages.
  • There are significant variations in life expectancy related to Socio-economic Inequality.  For a someone living in the most deprived area of B&NES, they can expect to die at a younger age than someone in the most affluent area of B&NES (9.2 years for men and 5.2 years for women).
  • Healthy Life Expectancy is also higher in B&NES for females and males compared to national and regional averages.

Life Expectancy is the expected (in the statistical sense) number of years of life remaining at a given age.  Because life expectancy is an average, a particular person may well die many years before or many years after their "expected" survival.  In line with the national trends, life expectancy has been increasing in B&NES, and is higher for females than males.1

What does the data say?2

  • Life expectancy at birth in B&NES is 81.3 years for males and 84.7 years for females (2012-14).
  • For males, this was higher than the South West (80.2 years) and England (79.6 years) averages.
  • For females, this was higher than the South West (83.9 years) and England (83.2) averages.

As life expectacy data is broken down by Deprivation, it is possible to extrapolate an expected life expectancy for each small area in B&NES. Figure 1 shows the life expectancy variation on various stops made by the 21C circular bus around Bath, Figure 2 shows the extrapolated figures for all LSOAs in B&NES, while Figures 3 and 4 show the gaps between most and least deprived deciles over time. 

Figure 1: The Life Expectancy Bus Route Map (Male life expectancy by income deprivation quintile 2011-13)



 
 Figures 3 and 4: Male and Female Life Expectancy Inequality Gaps, 2002-04 to 2012-14

Life Expectancy Deprivation Male

Life Expectancy Deprivation Female

The above illustrates that there are significant variations in life expectancy related to Socio-economic Inequality.  For a someone living in the most deprived area of B&NES, they can expect to die at a younger age than someone in the most affluent area of B&NES (9.2 years for men and 5.2 years for women in 2012-14).  For the first time since 2008-10 these inequality gaps in life expectancy for both genders have fallen (e.g. from 9.3 years for men and 5.4 years for women in 2011-13).

Life Expectancy Gaps by Cause of Death3

The Public Health England Segment Tool estimates the contribution that a broad case of death has on overall life expectancy between the most and least deprived areas of the authority.

PHE Segmentation Tool

Figure 4: Chart showing the breakdown of the life expectancy gap between the most deprived quintile and the least deprived quintile in Bath and North East Somerset, by cause of death, 2012-20144

  • Figure 4 shows the key differences in contibuting factors in life expectancy gaps for males and females by deprivation.
  • Cancer is the largest contributing factor to the gap for males (23.7%) followed by external causes (19.8%) and circulatory disease (19.0%).
  • Cancer is also the single largest contributing factor to the gap for females (24.9%), followed by 'other' causes of death (21.9%) and external causes (14.5%).
  • Notable differences between the genders are the greater contribution of circulatory and external causes of death for men compared to women.

Healthy Life Expectancy for both males (66.0 years) and females (68.5 years) in B&NES is higher than national levels (63.3 years for males and 63.9 years for females), and regional levels for (65.3 years for males and 65.5 years for females).  5 

The proportion of life spent in good health in B&NES is higher compared to national levels, at 81.6% for males and 81.1% for females (compared to 79.7% for males and 76.9% for females in England). The proportion of life spent in good health in B&NES is also higher compared to regional levels for females (78.2%), but the same as it is regionally for males (81.6%). 6