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Part of: Waste and Recycling

Related to: Bring Banks and Recycling Centres, Air Quality, Biodiversity, Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation, Ecosystem Services, Green Infrastructure and Spaces, Built Environment [[Streets and Highways]] [[Environmental Health]]

Key Facts

  • In Bath and North East Somerset the total waste collected from households at the kerbside in 2013/14 was 54,768 tonnes.
  • In 2013/14, 44% of waste collected from households at the kerbside in Bath and North East Somerset was diverted away from landfill (re-used, recovered, recycled or composted).
  • There has been a 6% increase in the proportion of waste from kerbside collections diverted from landfill (re-used, recovered, recycled or composted) since 2007/08.
  • In 2013/14 the greatest proportion of waste collected from households that was diverted from landfill was garden waste with 6,296 tonnes, followed by mixed paper with 4,848 tonnes, and glass, with 4,455 tonnes.
  • 95% of respondents to the 2014 Bath and North East Somerset Resident Survey outlined they use the existing green box service and 91% outlined they used the blue bag service.
  • 58% of respondents to the 2014 B&NES Resident Survey said their household produces one black sack of rubbish per week.
  • 76% of respondents to the 2012 B&NES Resident Survey rated the recycling collection service as very good or good.

What does the data say?

UK 1

Of the 200.0 million tonnes of total waste generated in the UK in 2012, households were responsible 14% (26.4 million tonnes).

The UK recycling rate of ‘waste from households’ reached 43.9 % (11.6 million tonnes) in 2012, rising from 42.9 per cent in 2011. There is an EU target for the UK to recycle at least 50 per cent by 2020.

Bath and North East Somerset 

In Bath and North East Somerset the total waste collected from households at the kerbside in 2013/14 was 54,768 tonnes this reflects a 2% reduction in the amount waste from household collections since 2007/08, when 55,875 tonnes were collected.  2 3  

In 2013/14, 24,006 tonnes of waste collected from households at the kerbside in Bath and North East Somerset was diverted away from landfill, and thus 44% of this waste was re-used, recovered, recycled or composted. This represents a 6% increase in the proportion of waste from kerbside collections diverted from landfill compared to 2007/08, when 21,265 tonnes, 38% of the waste collected was re-used, recovered, recycled or composted. 4 5  

Click here to see the waste collected from households at the kerbside in Bath and North East Somerset - measured in tonnes

 

Figure 1: Waste collected from households at the kerbside in Bath and North East Somerset (2007/08-2013/14) – measured in tonnes 6  

Figure 2: Outcome of waste collected from households at the kerbside in Bath and North East Somerset (2007/08-2013/14) 7  

In 2013/14 the greatest proportion of waste collected from households that was diverted from landfill in terms of weight was garden waste with 6,296 tonnes collected, followed by mixed paper with 4,848 tonnes, and glass, with 4,455 tonnes. The amount of garden waste collected has increased by 12% since 2010/11 (5,612 tonnes), mixed paper has decreased by 34% since 2007/08 (7,302 tonnes), and glass has decreased by 2% since 2007/08 (4,538 tonnes).  8

For the period of October 2010 when household kerbside food waste collections were introduced, and the end of 2012, 6,685 tonnes of food waste has been collected and diverted from landfill.

Figure 3: Types of waste collected from the households at the kerbside in Bath and North East Somerset that has been re-used, recovered, recycled or composted (2007/08-2013/14) (Part 1) -measured in tonnes* 9  

 

Figure 4: Types of waste collected from the households at the kerbside in Bath and North East Somerset that has been re-used, recovered, recycled or composted (2007/08-2013/14) (Part 2) -measured in tonnes* 10  

Figure 5: Types of waste collected from the households at the kerbside in Bath and North East Somerset that has been re-used, recovered, recycled or composted (2007/08-2013/14) (Part 3) -measured in tonnes* 11  

*It is important to note that where the lines on Figures 3-5 do not cover the whole period 2007/08-2013/14, this reflects the introduction of new recycling collections (such as food waste collections in October 2010), or the inclusion of waste types into new collections (such as the inclusion of plastic bottles in the new mixed plastic collection).

Waste compositional analysis - December 2013

Bath and North East Somerset Council commissioned Resource Futures to carry out a compositional analysis of residual waste, dry recycling and food waste. The analysis took place in October and November 2013. 381 households proportionally split between wards and collection days were included in the sample.

Capture rates are the percentage of recyclables that are collected for recycling divided by the total amount of recyclables that are generated.

On average a household in the sample presented 5.25kg (55.04 litres) of residual waste, 3.9kg (29.47 litres) of dry recyclables and 0.95kg (3.52 litres) of food waste.

Residual waste (non-recycling bins)

Figure 6: Results of 2013 Bath and North East Somerset residual waste (non-recycling bins) compositional analysis 

  • 32.5% was “biodegradable waste” and the majority of this (82.5%) was food waste.
  • Miscellaneous waste accounted for 24.9% of the composition (mostly nappies and animal waste).
  • Paper and card made up 14.6% (including 7.2% recyclable).
  • The plastics category (18.8%) includes dense plastics (bottles and trays) and plastic film (carrier bags, black bags and other film).
  • Overall, the proportion of material in the residual stream that is currently recyclable via the kerbside collection system provided by the Council was 50.5% with a further 5.4% of potentially recyclable plastics.

Dry Recyclables

The capture of the dry recyclables was good with most main materials (paper, card, glass, cans, PET/HDPE plastic) achieving high capture rates. However textiles only achieved a 9.7% capture rate. The contamination rate of the dry recycling stream was only 5.3%.

Food Waste

Food waste was not as well captured with capture rates of 40.6% and 37.4% for unavoidable and avoidable food waste respectively. The contamination of the food waste was low (1.7%).

What does the community say?

Voicebox Resident Survey 12  13

A summary of waste, recycling and litter Voicebox results can also be found here.

The large scale Voicebox Resident Survey aims to provide an insight into Bath and North East Somerset and its local communities and to capture resident’s views and experiences of their local area and council services. The questionnaires are posted to 3,150 addresses selected randomly in the local authority area. Selected respondents also have the opportunity to complete the survey online.

The Voicebox Surveys carried out in 2012 and 2014 asked a series of questions about household waste kerbside collection.

In 2012 a total of 850 residents completed the questionnaire, a response rate of 27%. In 2014 a total of 975 residents completed the questionnaire, a response rate of 31%. 

2014 Voicebox Resident Survey 14

The 2014 Voicebox Resident Survey asked residents questions about the following waste and recycling topics:

  • Use of existing recycling services
  • Black sacks of rubbish produced by households
  • Storage of rubbish 

Use of existing recycling services - When respondents were asked - Do you use the following existing recycling services? –

95% of respondents outlined they use the existing green box service and 91% outlined they used the blue bag service.

71% of respondents outlined they use the food waste in black caddy service, 29% did not.

Figure 7: Use of Bath and North East Somerset recycling services by respondents to the 2014 Voicebox Resident Survey 15

Black sacks of rubbish produced by households – When respondents were asked - On average how many black sacks of rubbish does your household produce a week? -

The majority of respondents (58%) outlined their household produces one black sack of rubbish per week.

Figure 8: Black sacks of rubbish produced by the households of respondents to the 2014 B&NES Voicebox Resident Survey 16

Storage of rubbish - When respondents were asked - What do you use to store and put your rubbish out for collection in? –

Respondents said that they used the following:

  • 82% black sacks
  • 21% a traditional dustbin
  • 14% carrier bags
  • 6% reusable rubbish bags
  • 5% other

When respondents were asked - Is there somewhere suitable for you to store a small wheeled bin for rubbish on your property? –

72% of respondents outlined there was somewhere suitable to store a small wheeled bin at their property, 28% outlined there was nowhere suitable.

When respondents were asked - Would you prefer to use a small wheeled bin instead of your existing method of storage for rubbish? –

51% of respondents outlined they would prefer a small wheeled bin and 49% outlined they would not.

What people liked about the refuse and recycling collection service - Respondents were given the opportunity to outline in a free text box what they liked about the current refuse and recycling collection service. 809 out of the 975 respondents (83%) responded to this question. 

The main themes that came up repeatedly were:

  • That it is a weekly service – approx. 252 (31%*) respondents
  • Its regularity and reliability – approx. 245 (30%*) respondents
  • Wide range of material that can be recycled – approx. 67 (8%*) respondents
  • Polite, friendly and helpful staff – approx. 49 (6%*) respondents

* Of the 809 respondents who responded to this question

What people did not like about the refuse and recycling collection service - Respondents were also given the opportunity to outline in a free text box what they did not like about the current refuse and recycling collection service. 491 out of the 975 respondents (50%) responded to this question.

The main themes that came up repeatedly were:

  • Mess left after a collection – approx. 89 (18%*) respondents
  • Problems with birds and animals getting into rubbish – approx. 36 (7%*) respondents
  • Cost of garden waste collection – approx. 34 (7%)

* Of the 491 respondents who responded to this question. 

What would help people recycle more - Respondents were given the opportunity to outline in a free text box what would help them recycle more. 505 out of the 975 respondents (52%) responded to this question. 

The main themes that came up repeatedly were:

  • Expansion of materials collected for recycling (esp. black plastic) – approx. 69 (14%*) respondents
  • Change in size, number or type of recycling containers approx. 49 (10%*) respondents

* Of the 505 respondents who responded to this question. 

2008, 2010 and 2012 Voicebox Resident Surveys 17  18 19 

Satisfaction with Waste and Recycling Services

The 2008, 2010 and 2012 Voicebox Resident Surveys asked residents to rate their satisfaction with various waste and recycling services.

The recycling collection service  and recycling centres - The proportions of respondents that rated their satisfaction with the recycling collection service and the recycling centres as very good or good were significantly higher in 2012 compared to 2008.   

Figure 9: 2008 and 2012 Voicebox respondents' satisfaction with the recycling collection service and the recycling centres 

The garden waste service – Though the level of satisfaction with the garden waste service was slightly lower in 2010 and 2012 compared to 2008, this decline was not statistically significant.  

Figure 10: 2008, 2010 and 2012 Voicebox respondents' satisfaction with the garden waste service 

The extent that staff are polite, courteous and treat all their customers fairly

The 2008, 2010 and 2012 Voicebox Resident Surveys asked residents the extent to which they agreed with the statement “staff working in the following services are polite, courteous and treat all their customers fairly” in relation to various waste and recycling services. 

The recycling collection service  and recycling centres - The proportions of respondents that strongly agreed that staff working in the recycling collection service and the recycling centres were polite, courteous and treated all their customers fairly were significantly higher in 2012 compared to 2010

Figure 11: 2010 and 2012 Voicebox respondents that agreed that staff working in the recycling collection service and the recycling centres were polite, courteous and treated all their customers fairly 

The garden waste service - The proportion of respondents that strongly agreed that staff working in the garden waste service were polite, courteous and treated all their customers fairly was slightly higher in 2012 compared to 2010, but this increase was not statistically significant.

Figure 12: 2010 and 2012 Voicebox respondents that agreed that staff working in the garden waste service and the recycling centres were polite, courteous and treated all their customers fairly 

Are we meeting the needs?

We are amongst the top recycling authorities within the country – but we still landfill most of our waste that is not recycled. 20

In 2012/13, a collection for small waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) was added to kerbside recycling collections. There was also a successful trial of reusable refuse sacks, and a reorganisation of collection routes to improve efficiently. 21

A new waste treatment contract started in 2011/12, diverting 9,100 tonnes of waste from the black bin away from landfill. 22

Food waste collections were introduced in October 2010.23

In 2009/10 83.51% of missed black refuse bins were collected within 24 hours.24