Part of: Education

Related to: Ill Health and Disability, Socio-economic Inequality, Education Absence and Exclusion, Not in Education, Employment or Training, Wellbeing, Children and Young People, Sex and Gender

Key Facts:

  • In 2015, 70% of eligible children in Bath and North East Somerset were defined as having reached a good level of development at the end of the Early Years Foundation Stage (0-5 years), this was silightly higher than England (66%) and was a significant improvement on 2014 (63%).
  • In B&NES in 2015 54% of children with free school meal status achieved a good level of development at the end of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS), significantly lower than non-free school meal pupils (71%). However, the gap between disadvantaged children and others narrowed from 34% in 2014 to 17% in 2015, the largest improvement nationally.
  • In 2015 82% of primary school children in B&NES achieved level 4 + in reading, writing and maths combined, compared to 80% nationally. 
  • In 2015 in B&NES 83% of socio-economically disadvantage key stage 2 pupils achieved level 4+ in reading, compared to 94% of other pupils, 76% achieved this in writing compared to 91% of other pupils, and 77% in mathematics compared to 92% of other pupils. 
  • The key stage 2 level 5 + attainment gap between socio-economically disadvantage pupils and others in B&NES in 2015 widened compared to 2014 in all three subjects, from 24% to 27% in reading, 19% to 24% in writing and 17% to 20% in mathematics.
  • In 2015, overall the proportion of pupils who achieved 5A* - C GCSEs including English and mathematics in B&NES (62%) remained above the South West (57%) and national (56%) averages. 
  • In B&NES in 2015 36% of socio-economically disadvantage pupils achieved 5A* - C GCSEs including English and mathematics compared to 69% of other pupils. However, the gap between socio-economically disadvantaged pupils and other pupils had narrowed in 2015 by 8% compared to 2013.
  • In B&NES in 2015 74.2% of the A-Level students achieved 3 or more A-Levels at A*-E, this was lower than the national achievement level of 78.7%.  
  • 12.4% of the A-Level students in B&NES in 2015 achieved 3 or more A-Levels at AAB or higher (in 3 facilitating subjects), this was lower than the national rate of 14.7%.  
  • In 2015 in B&NES 41.6% of the key stage 5 vocational students achieved 3 or more substantial vocational qualifications, this was lower than the national rate of 47.5%. 
  • B&NES is higher than the national figure for 7-11 yr old students with a special educational needs without a statement.
  • Educational achievement is strongly linked to Sex and Gender and Socio-economic Inequality

What does the data say?

Unicef’s 2013 educational achievement by age 15 in rich countries comparative overview 1

In Unicef’s 2013 educational achievement by age 15 in rich countries comparative overview, Unicef compares the world’s most advanced economies.

PISA measures pupils ‘abilities in three basic competences– reading, maths and science. Repeated every three years, the tests are administered to representative samples of 15-yearolds and are intended to measure knowledge and skills in relation to the demands of managing lives and careers in the modern world .In total, 34 member countries of the OECD, plus non-member partner countries, participate in this evaluation of educational achievement.

According to Unicef’s report the UK’s educational achievement by age 15 overall average PISA score for english, maths and science is 500, and is mid table. Finland is a remarkable outlier at the top of the table –registering with a score over 540, a score almost 20 points clear of the second placed country. Canada and the Netherlands take second and third places. Three of Europe’s wealthiest countries, Austria, Luxembourg and Sweden, find themselves in the bottom half of the educational achievement table, as do all four countries of southern Europe. Lithuania, Greece and Romania have the lowest scores, all below 480.

It is important to note that one of the limitations of these league tables is that internationally comparable data on children’s lives is not sufficiently timely. Between the collection of data in a wide variety of different settings and their publication in quality-controlled, internationally comparable form, the time-lag is typically two to three years. This means that most of the statistics on child well-being used in this report, though based on the latest available data, apply to the period 2009–2010.


School Readiness in Bath and North East Somerset 2

School readiness of children is measured through a set of government standards for the learning, development and care of children from birth to 5 years old known as the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS). This is a key measure of early years development across a wide range of developmental areas. Children from poorer backgrounds are more at risk of poorer development and the evidence shows that differences by social background emerge early in life.

All schools and Ofsted-registered early years providers must follow the EYFS, including childminders, preschools, nurseries and school reception classes.

There are assessments when a child is aged between 2 and 3 years and at the end of the academic year when they turn 5. These are not tests for the child - the assessments are based on EYFS practitioners’ observations. Information from these assessments is used for parents, practitioners and teachers to support children’s learning and development.

Early years learning concentrates on 7 areas split between prime and specific areas of learning.

The prime areas of learning are:

  • communication and language
  • physical development
  • personal, social and emotional development

The specific areas of learning are:

  • literacy
  • mathematics
  • understanding the world
  • expressive arts and design

At the end of the academic year when a child turns 5, the practitioner records each child’s development by watching the child playing and in the classroom. The completed assessment is known as the ‘early years foundation stage profile’. This is used to help the year 1 teacher plan lessons for the children.

Children are defined as having reached a good level of development if they achieve at least the expected level in the early learning goals in the prime areas of learning (personal, social and emotional development; physical development; and communication and language) and the early learning goals in the specific areas of mathematics and literacy. 3

In 2015 70% of eligible children in Bath and North East Somerset were defined as having reached a good level of development at the end of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS), a significant improvement compared to 2014 (63%). The B&NES 2015 rate was silightly higher than England (66%). 4

Compared to 2014, in 2015 outcomes improved for all children across the Early Learning Goals (ELG), with a much faster rate of improvement in literacy (+5%), writing (+5.4), communication and language (+4%) and Personal Social and Emotional Development (+4.3%) compared to national averages. 5


Year 1 phonics performance6

Phonics is a method of teaching people to read and pronounce words by learning the sounds of letters, letter groups, and syllables. 7

The proportion of pupils who achieved the national threshold standard in the Y1 phonics test in B&NES in 2015 improved for the fourth consecutive year (from 74 % in 2014) to 79%.  This was above the national average of 77%.  This is a local authority improvement of 5% compared to the national improvement of 3%. 


Primary school education in Bath and North East Somerset

Pupils in Foundation stage, key stages, 1, 2 and 4 continue to attain well compared with other local authorities and national levels 8.

Key Stage 19

In 2015 in B&NES overall attainment at the end of KS1 remained high, 87% achieved level 2b+ in reading,  76% in writing and 86% in mathematics, higher than the national average of 82% in reading, 72% in writing and 82% in mathematics. The 2015 B&NES KS1 level 2b + performance was also an improvement on 2014 when it was 84% in reading, 70% in writing and 83% in mathematics.  The rate of improvement was more rapid than the national average and attainment in all core subjects was above the national average for the fourth consecutive year. 

Attainment at the higher level 3+ in B&NES in 2015 remained significantly above the national average in all the core subjects, 39% in reading compared to 32% nationally, 21% in writing compared to 18% nationally, and 29% in mathematics compared to 26% nationally. This was also an improvement compared to 2014 when it was 36% for reading, 19% for writing and 28% for mathematics. 

Key Stage 2 10

In 2015 in B&NES the overall attainment of pupils at the end of Key Stage 2 was above the national average for the fourth consecutive year.  The proportion of pupils in B&NES who achieved level 4+ in reading, writing and mathematics combined in 2015 was 82% (83% in 2014) compared to 80% nationally (79% in 2014). In terms of the educational attainment in B&NES in 2015 in the individual subjects, 92% of pupils achieved level 4 + in reading (92% in 2014), 89% in writing (88% in 2014) and 88% in mathematics (89% in 2014). The proportions of pupils in B&NES achieving level 4 + at key stage 2 in 2015 were slightly higher than the national averages, which were 89% in reading, 87% in writing, and 87% in mathematics. 11

Attainment at the higher level 5 +  at key stage 2 in B&NES in 2015 was above the national average in all the core subjects, 56% in reading compared to 48% nationally, 37% in writing compared to 36% nationally, and 43% in mathematics compared to 41% nationally.  The proportion of pupils in B&NES in 2015 who achieved the higher levels for combined reading, writing and mathematics was also slightly above the national average (25% compared to 24%). However, apart from in writing (36% in 2014), the proportion of pupils in B&NES achieving level 5 +  had decreased compared to 2014 when it was 58% in reading and 46% in mathematics.

Progress from Key Stage 1 to Key Stage 212

Overall the proportion of pupils in B&NES in 2015 who achieved expected progress (national expectations) from Key Stage 1 to the end of Key Stage 2 was slightly lower than the national average for all subjects:

  • 90% in reading compared to 91% nationally
  • 92% in writing compared to 94% nationally 
  • 88% in mathematics compared to 90% nationally 

The proportion of pupils in B&NES in 2015 who achieved expected progress in reading decreased by 2% compared to 2014 (92% in 2014) and by 2% in mathematics (90% in 2014), this contrasts with improvements at the national level of 1% in writing and 1% in mathematics. 


Secondary school education in Bath and North East Somerset13

In B&NES in 2015 pupil attainment at Key Stage 4 (GCSEs) was agreed by Ofsted as the strongest in the region. In 2015, overall the proportion of KS4 pupils who achieved 5A* - C GCSEs including English and mathematics in B&NES (62%) remained above the South West (57%) and national (56%) averages. For the third consecutive year attainment is above the national average despite changes in the way in which the entry is calculated from 2014 onwards.

In 2015 the proportion of KS4 pupils who achieved 5A* - C GCSEs including English and mathematics in B&NES remined the same as in 2014 (62%), but was slightly lower than in 2013 (64%). This reflected the regional and national trends, as the proportions of KS4 pupils who achieved 5A* - C GCSEs including English and mathematics in the South West and England in 2015 remined the same as in 2014 (57% and 56% respectively), but were lower than in 2013 (60% for both). 

Expected Progress from KS2 to KS414

Overall the proportion of pupils in B&NES in 2015 who achieved expected progress from Key Stage 2 to the end of Key Stage 4 in english and mathematics was above the national average:

  • 76% in english compared to 71% nationally
  • 73% in mathematics compared to 68% nationally 

The proportion of pupils in B&NES in 2015 who achieved expected progress in english increased by 2% compared to 2014 (74% in 2014) and by 4% in mathematics (69% in 2014), this contrasts with a decrease at the national level of 2% in english (71% in 2014) and an increase by 1% in mathematics (67% in 2014). 

Value Added15

Value added for pupils best 8 subjects (actually 10 subjects due to the English and Maths bonus) shows that pupils in Bath and North East Somerset make less progress than expected taking into account their prior ability.  Although higher prior ability pupils make better progress than similar pupils nationally, middle ability, and particularly lower prior ability pupils, make lower progress than their peers nationally.  For lower ability pupils this amounts to each child achieving half a grade below what would be expected for all of the subjects in the measure. Value added is a more comprehensive measure of progress than expected progress and gives a more accurate picture of the overall progress achieved.  

English Baccalaureate[fn] Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council

The English Baccalaureate is a measure of performance that identifies English, mathematics, science, a modern or classical language, and either history or geography as qualifying subjects.  Pupils’ in B&NES outperform the South West and national averages for the proportion of pupils who achieve the English Baccalaureate and B&NES is ranked number 1 of the 15 local authorities in the South West.

English Baccalaureate

2015

 

% entered

% achieved

B&NES

54

33

South West

38

23

National

39

24

Year 11 destination report 2013 16

The Annual Activity Survey records leaving information for students who completed year 11 in B&NES schools in 2013.  Please note this is based on student destinations on 1 November 2013.

The percentage of year 11 students participating in learning has increased, in comparison to last year -  96.6% in 2013, compared to 94.7% in 2012.  This includes students in sixth forms, colleges, apprenticeships, and jobs with training to NVQ level 2 or above.

The percentage of students who were NEET has decreased to 1.6% in 2013, in comparison to 2.7% in 2012.  In November 2013, just 36 year 11 leavers were not in education, employment or training (NEET) out of a cohort of 2236 students.


Post 16 education in Bath and North East Somerset17

In B&NES in 2015 74.2% of the A-Level students achieved 3 or more A-Levels at A*-E, this was lower than the national achievement level of 78.7%.  

12.4% of the A-Level students in B&NES in 2015 achieved 3 or more A-Levels at AAB or higher (in 3 *facilitating subjects), this was lower than the national rate of 14.7%.  

* Facilitating subjects are ones that are commonly needed for entry to leading universities. They are: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Further Mathematics, Geography, History, English Literature and Classical or Modern Languages.

In 2015 in B&NES 41.6% of the key stage 5 vocational students achieved 3 or more substantial vocational qualifications, this was lower than the national rate of 47.5%.  


Inequalities in education achievement in Bath and North East Somerset

Gaps in Early Years Foundation Stage performance18

Socio-economic background - In B&NES in 2015 54% of children with free school meal status achieved a good level of development at the end of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS), significantly lower than non-free school meal pupils (71%).  However, this is an improvement compared to 2014, when 33% of children with free school meal status achieved a good level of development at the end of the EYFS compared to 67% of non-free school meal pupils. This means that the gap between disadvantaged children and others narrowed from 34% in 2014 to 17%  in 2015, the largest improvement nationally. 

The 2015 B&NES rate of 54% of children with free school meal status that achieved a good level of development at the end of the Early Years Foundation Stage was similar to the rate for England (51%). 

Gender - The proportion of boys achieving a good level of development in B&NES has improved, but girls continue to outperform boys and the gap in 2015 remained at 14%.

Ethnicity - The gap for Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) children in B&NES increased by 2%  in 2015 to 11%. 

Children with the lowest scores - The gap between children in the bottom 20% of the scores and the rest in 2015 narrowed by 5% to 25%.


Gaps in year 1 phonics performance19

Socio-economic background - In 2015 in B&NES 61% of socio-economically disadvantaged pupils met the national year 1 phonics threshold, a 4% improvement on the previous year, but this was lower than the national average of 66%.  Also, the B&NES gap in 2015 betweed disadvantage pupils and others of 22% was much higher than the national gap of 14%.  

Gender - Girls continue to perform better than boys in terms of achieving the national threshold standard in the Y1 phonics test, however the gap in B&NES narrowed to 4% in 2015 (77% of boys, 81% of girls) and this is lower than the national gap of 8% (73% of boys, 81% of girls).  Consequently, the B&NES boys’ performance is better than it is nationally and overall boys performance in B&NES is improving (it was 70% in 2014). 

Special education needs - In B&NES pupils with support for special education needs and with statements or Education Health Care Plans (EHC) perform better than their peers nationally, in 2015 performing 6% and 2% above national average respectively.

Special education need statments - is a document which sets out a child’s SEN and any additional help that the child should receive. The aim of the Statement is to make sure that the child gets the right support to enable them to make progress in school.

Education Health Care Plans (EHC) - is the document which has replaced Statements of SEN and Learning Difficulties Assessments for children and young people with special educational needs. 20


Gaps in Key Stage 1 performance21

Socio-economic background - In 2015 in B&NES 71% of socio-economically disadvantage pupils achieved level 2b+ in reading, compared to 90% of other pupils, 55% achieved this in writing compared to 81% of other pupils, and 68% in mathematics compared to 90% of other pupils.  

The key stage 1 at level 2b+ performance of socio-economically disadvantage pupils in B&NES in 2015 was an improvement in reading and writing compared to 2014 when it was 69% and 52% respectively, but it remained the same in mathematics. The gaps in performance between socio-economically disadvantage pupils and other pupils remained the same in reading (19%) , but there was a slight increase in the gap in writing (22% in 2014, 26% in 2015) and mathematics (19% in 2014 and 22% in 2015). In 2015 in B&NES the gaps also remained higer than nationally, which were 14% in reading, 18% in writing and 14% in mathematics.  

In B&NES in 2015, socio-economically disadvantage pupils' attainment at the higher level of level 3 + dipped in reading (17% in 2014 and 15% in 2015) and writing (9% in 2014 and 6% in 2015) and remained the same as the previous year in mathematics (13%).  The level 3 + attainment gap between socio-economically disadvantage pupils and others in 2015 widened compared to 2014 in all three subjects, from 23% to 29% in reading, 12% to 18% in writing and 18% to 20% in mathematics. The level 3+ attainment of socio-economically disadvantage pupil in B&NES in 2015 was just below the national average (19% in reading, 9% in writing and 15% in mathematics) in all the core subjects.

Gender - In B&NES in 2015 girls outperformed boys in all the core subjects in terms of achieving level 2 b+. 83% of boys pupils achieved level 2b+ in reading compared to 90% of girls, 69% achieved this in writing compared to 84% of girls, and 86% in mathematics compared to 87% of girls.  However, the gap is narrowing across the board compared to 2014, from 9% to 7% in reading, 19% to 15% in writing andfrom 7% to 1% in mathematics.

Boys’ attainment of level 2b+ in B&NES in 2015 was also an improvement compared to 2014 when it was 80% in reading, 61% in writing and 80% in mathematics.  

In terms of achieving the higher level 3+ in 2015 in B&NES, girls continued to outperform boys in reading and writing, but the gaps have narrowed. However, boys performed better than girls at level 3+ in mathematics and the gap between their performance and that of girls at this higher level widened.  

In 2015 B&NES girls’ attainment at level 3 + improved in reading (43% in 2014 and 45% in 2015), but dipped slightly in writing (27% in 2014 and 26% in 2015) and mathematics (27% in 2014 and 26% in 2015). Boys’ attainment at level 3 + on the other hand improved in all the core subjects, from 30% in 2014 to 33% in 2015 in reading, from 12% to 15% in writing and 29% to 32% in mathematics. 

Furthermore, it is important to note that the attainment of both boys and girls is significantly above the national average in all the core subjects. 

Ethnicity - BME pupils’ attainment of level 2b+ at key stage 1in B&NES in 2015 also improved in all subjects and the gaps have narrowed compared.

B&NES data for 2015 shows improved outcomes for BME pupils’ attainment of level 3 + in reading.  It also shows that the gaps between BME pupils and others had closed in reading and writing, but increased in mathematics.

Special education needs - In B&NES in 2015 the attainment of level 2b+ by pupils with Special Education Needs (SEN) Support, SEN statements or Education Health and Care (EHC) Plans was above the national average in reading, writing and mathematics.

The attainment of level 3 + in 2015 by B&NES pupils with SEN support was slightly below the national average for mathematics but above for reading and writing.  B&NES pupils with SEN statements or EHC plans attainment of level 3+ was the same as the national average for reading and writing and slightly below for mathematics. 


Gaps in Key Stage 2 performance22

Socio-economic background -  In 2015 in B&NES 83% of socio-economically disadvantage pupils achieved level 4+ in reading, compared to 94% of other pupils, 76% achieved this in writing compared to 91% of other pupils, and 77% in mathematics compared to 92% of other pupils.  

The key stage 2 at level 4+ performance of socio-economically disadvantage pupils in B&NES in 2015 decreased in reading and mathematics compared to 2014 when it was 86% and 81% respectively, but it remained the same in writing (76%). The gaps in performance between socio-economically disadvantage pupils and other pupils in B&NES increased in reading by 3% (from 8% in 2014 to 11% in 2015), and mathematics by 5% (from 10% in 2014 to 15% in 2015), but stayed the same in writing (15%). The percentage of disadvantaged B&NES pupils who achieved level 4+ in reading, writing and mathematics combined also decreased from 68% in 2014 to 67% in 2015 and was below the 2015 national average of 70%. 

In B&NES in 2015, socio-economically disadvantage pupils' attainment at the higher level 5 + dipped in reading (39% in 2014 to 34% in 2015), writing (21% in 2014 to 17% in 2015) and mathematics (32% in 2014 to 27% in 2015). The level 5 + attainment gap between socio-economically disadvantage pupils and others in B&NES in 2015 also widened compared to 2014 in all three subjects, from 24% to 27% in reading, 19% to 24% in writing and 17% to 20% in mathematics. The level 5+ attainment of socio-economically disadvantage pupil in B&NES in 2015 was below the national average in writing (22%) and mathematics (28%), but the same as the national average in reading (34%).

Gender - In B&NES in 2015 girls outperformed boys in achieving level 4 + in reading with 93% compared to 91% of boys and mathematics with 92% compared to 84% of boys, but not in writing where a higher proportion of boys (90%) achieved level 4 + compared to girls (88%).  The gap between girls and boys narrowed in reading (from 3% in 2014 to 2% in 2015) and writing (from 10% in 2014 to 2% in 2015), but widened in mathematics (from 1% in 2014 to 8% in 2015).  The gaps between the attainment of girls and boys are at least the same or narrower than the national averages. 

In terms of achieving the higher level 5+ in 2015 in B&NES, girls continued to outperform boys in reading (61% compared to 51% for boys) and writing (44% compared to 29% for boys), but the gaps have narrowed (11% in reading in 2014 to 10% in 2015 and 20% in writing in 2014 to 15%). However, boys performed better than girls at level 5+ in mathematics (51% compared to 35% for girls) and the gap between their performance and that of girls at this higher level widened (from 2% to 16%), largely to do with a significant decrease in performance by girls from 45% in 2014 to 35% in 2015. In 2015 B&NES girls’ attainment at level 5 + was also lower in reading compared to 2014 when it was 64%  and in writing when it was 47%. Boys’ attainment at level 5 + in 2015 on the other hand, was an improvement compared to 2014 in writing when it was 27% and mathematics when it was 47%, only decreasing in reading, as it had been 53% in 2014. 

Ethnicity - In 2015 in B&NES BME pupils’ attainment of level 4 + improved in writing and mathematics and the gaps with non-BME pupils narrowed for the third consecutive year.

Special education needs - The attainment of level 4 + by pupils with SEN support in B&NES in 2015 was above the national average in all subjects while the attainment of pupils with SEN statements or Education Health and Care (EHC) plans was below national for all subjects.


Gaps in progress from Key Stage 1 to Key Stage 223

Socio-economic background - In 2015 in B&NES 82% of socio-economically disadvantage pupils achieved expected progress from Key Stage 1 to the end of Key Stage 2 in reading, compared to 92% of other pupils, 87% achieved this in writing compared to 93% of other pupils, and 79% in mathematics compared to 89% of other pupils.

The expected progress from Key Stage 1 to the end of Key Stage 2 performance of socio-economically disadvantage pupils in B&NES in 2015 decreased in reading and mathematics compared to 2014 when it was 85% and 87% respectively, but it increased slightly in writing as it was 86% in 2014. The gaps in performance between socio-economically disadvantage pupils and other pupils in B&NES increased in reading by 2% (from 8% in 2014 to 10% in 2015), and mathematics by 7% (from 3% in 2014 to 10% in 2015), but decreased by 2% in writing (8% in 2014 to 6% in 2015). 

Gender - In B&NES in 2015 girls outperformed boys in achieving expected progress from Key Stage 1 to the end of Key Stage 2 in reading with 91% compared to 89% of boys and writing with 93% compared to 90% of boys, but not in mathematics where a higher proportion of boys (90%) achieved expected progress compared to girls (85%). The gap between girls and boys increased in reading (from 0% in 2014 to 2% in 2015) and mathematics (from 1% in 2014 to 5% in 2015), but narrowed in writing (from 5% in 2014 to 3% in 2015). 


Gaps in Key Stage 4 (GCSEs) performance24

Socio-economic background - In 2015 in B&NES 36% of socio-economically disadvantage pupils achieved 5A* - C GCSEs including English and mathematics compared to 69% of other pupils. The proportion of socio -economically  disadvantaged pupils achieving 5A* - C including English and mathematics in B&NES in2015 was 1% below the national average (37%).  

The trend in the proportion of socio-economically disadvantage pupils in B&NES achieving 5A* - C GCSEs including English and mathematics has been improving (31% in 2013, 33% in 2014 and 36% in 2015) in contrast to the national trend, which has decreased since 2013 (41%), and remained the same compared to 2014 (37%).  In addition, in B&NES the gap between socio-economically disadvantaged pupils and other pupils had narrowed in 2015 by 8% compared to 2013. 

Gender - In B&NES in 2015 girls outperformed boys in achieving 5A* - C GCSEs including English and mathematics with 67% compared to 57% of boys.  In 2015 the gap between boys and girls in terms of achieving 5A* - C GCSEs including English and mathematics was 9.5%, which was a slight increase on 2014, but was lower than the national gap of 9.9%.


What does the community say?

For the results of the Child Health and Wellbeing Survey see Child Health and Wellbeing Survey section.

  • 1. Unicef Research (2013) Child well-being in rich countries: A comparative overview, http://www.unicef.org.uk/Images/Campaigns/FINAL_RC11-ENG-LORES-fnl2.pdf (downloaded 31/01/14)
  • 2. Gov.UK (2014) Early Years Foundation Stage, https://www.gov.uk/early-years-foundation-stage(viewed 06/01/2015)
  • 3. Public Health England (2014) Bath and North East Somerset, Children's and Young People's Mental Health and Wellbeing Profile and data, http://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile-group/mental-health/profile/cypmh/data#gid/1938132752/pat/6/ati/102/page/9/par/E12000009/are/E06000022 
  • 4. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 5. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 6. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 7. Merriam Webster Dictionary, http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/phonics  (viewed 26.05.2016)
  • 8. Bath and North East Somerset Council (2012) School Performance Data Report, p1
  • 9. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 10. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 11. Policy Development Scutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 12. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 13. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 14. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 15. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 16. B&NES year 11 destination report (annual activity survey) 2013 - recieved from The Learning Partnership/Connexions
  • 17. Department of Education (22nd March 2016) School and Local Statistics, Bath and North East Somerset, KS5 2015 Results, http://www.education.gov.uk/cgi-bin/schools/performance/group.pl?qtype=LA&no=800&superview=p16 (viewed 08/06/2016)
  • 18. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 19. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 20. IPSEA (Independent Parental Special Education Advice) (2016) Ehc (Education, Health And Care) Plans, https://www.ipsea.org.uk/what-you-need-to-know/ehc-plans (viewed 26.05.2016)
  • 21. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 22. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 23. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 24. Policy Development Scrutiny Panel (2016) Education Results 2015, Bath and North East Somerset Council