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Related to: InequalitiesTourism and the Visitor EconomyLibraries Needs Assessment , Voicebox Resident Survey

Key Facts

  • There are 4.5 million tourist visits to the City of Bath each year
  • 1 in 3 B&NES residents have a residents discovery card entitling them to free entry to local cultural facilities.
  • Local participation in cultural activity relates strongly to socio-economic background
  • The majority of respondents to the Voicebox Resident Survey stated that they had more than five hours of leisure time per week, 62% in 2015 and 61% in 2013. 
  • The proportion of respondents to the Voicebox Resident Survey who stated that they had two or more hours of leisure time a week has decreased, from 94% in 2013 to 87% in 2015.  
  • 85% of respondents to the 2015 Voicebox Resident Survey said they used the internet/social media networks in their leisure time on a daily or weekly basis
  • 38% of respondents to the 2015 Voicebox Resident Survey said they used public libraries in B&NES, and 87% of them said they were satisfied with the library service.

What does the data say?

Historic England Heritage Information1

Historic England carries out a number of studies into the historic environment at a national, regional and local authority level:

  • Heritage Counts - analyses a series of indicators which provide an insight into the state of the historic environment. In most cases, these indicators have been collected since 2002, providing over 10 years of trend data.

Click here to see the 2016 Heritage Counts reports

  • The Heritage Economic Impact Indicator Workbook - an interactive Excel-based workbook that estimates the national and regional economic impact of the heritage sector.

Click here to see The Heritage Economic Impact Indicator Workbook 2016

  • Local Authority Profiles - are comprehensive datasets and information on the historic environment for each local authority in England.

Click here to see the Local Authority Profiles 2016


Bath and North East Somerset

In addition to the 4.5 million tourist visitors to the City of Bath2 There is evidence of significant cultural activity within the local population

In 2011 there were 1,110,085 visitors to the museums and galleries run by the Council in Bath and North East Somerset, these were broken down as follows: Fashion Museum 134,989 visitors,  Roman Baths 975,096 visitors and the Victoria Art Gallery 110,498 visitors. 3

Attendance & participation in arts & cultural activity is greater amongst social classes ABC1, with little participation in social classes DE45

Inclination to attend is largely determined by educational attainment and disposable income

Non-attendance can be due to variety of practical factors including ability to travel, cost, family responsibilities, but can also be due to feeling excluded from a cultural offer which is perceived to be for ‘others’

Some cultural organisations address this self-exclusion factor by responding to communities’ needs and providing the type of activity that people want; other cultural organisations address it by adapting methods of promotion to attract the target group; some cultural organisations do both, or neither6

Individuals who engage in regular leisure-time activity of any intensity are less likely to have symptoms of depression. The context and social benefits of exercise are important in explaining this relationship. Social factors such as social support and social engagement may partially explain this relationship7

Just over a third of all respondents are registered for a Residents’ Discovery card8

The number of marriage services conducted (2001 to 2010) is significantly higher in B&NES at 7 per 1000 population compared to 4.6 for England. This data is for all registered marriages conducted in Bath and includes non-residents who choose to get married in B&NES. 9

Olympics, Paralympics and Cultural Olympiad events and projects 2012 10

Total participation of 449,097 people across 140 events and projects.

20 main events managed or financially supported by the council – 341,687 participants (including torch relay, exhibitions, school activities, community projects and street parties)

Heritage services schools, family and community activities in 2012 – 4,047 participants across 20 activities including exhibitions, family drop-in events and youth club activities

Bath Spa University RELAYS (a national programme to enable Universities to engage with sports and arts projects) - 3 projects from 2009-2012, with 140 events. 103,033 participants including 1,851 young people engaged.

There were positive impacts for tourism, with the events producing significant visitor numbers and consequent spend, such as visits to Visitbath.co.uk, online bookings, retail sales at information centres. As expected, there was also a negative effect on participation in heritage services (400 fewer visitors to the Roman Baths and Fashion Museum than the same day in 2011 due to the torch relay) and an impact on ticket sales for the Bath International Music Festival.

It is hoped that the use of local suppliers and contractors (for example: stewarding, catering, event management, technical/staging, security, artists and performers, photographers, filming) will have had a positive impact on the local workforce.

The social and community impact of the events and projects of 2012 has been very visible and widely celebrated. The full report contains a number of community quote from across the array of events.


What does the community say?

Voicebox Resident Survey 11 12 13 14 15

The large scale Voicebox Resident Survey aims to provide an insight into Bath and North East Somerset and its local communities and to capture resident’s views on their local area and council services. In 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014 the questionnaires were posted to 3,150 addresses selected randomly in the local authority area, and in 2015 3,650 addresses. Respondents also have the opportunity to complete the survey online.

The Voicebox Surveys carried out in 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 asked a number of questions related to cultural activities and people's leisure time.

In 2011 a total of 1,072 residents completed the questionnaire, a response rate of 34%. In 2012 a total of 850 residents completed it, a response rate of 27%, in 2013 a total of 1,189 residents completed it, a response rate of 38%, in 2014 a total of 975 residents completed the questionnaire, a response rate of 31%, and in 2015 a total of 1,067 residents completed it, a response rate of 29% (sample was 3,650).

2015 Voicebox Resident Survey - Public Libraries 16 17

The Voicebox Survey carried out in 2015 asked questions about public libraries:

  • Whether they use public libraries
  • How often they use public libraries and mobile libraries 
  • What they use libraries for
  • How satisfied they are with the library service
  • Why non users do not use public libraries 

Whether they use public libraries - When respondents were asked - Do you use public libraries in Bath and North East Somerset? -38% of respondents said they used public libraries in B&NES.

How often they use public libraries and mobile libraries -  When the users of public libraries were asked - How often do you use your local library service? - Only 11% of public library users used a mobile library service on a weekly or monthly basis. Of the remainder 78% used them less regularly than yearly. 55% of public library users used their local public library on a weekly or monthly basis.

Figure 1: How often respondents to the 2015 Voicebox Survey said they used public libraries and mobile libraries 18

What they use libraries for - When the users of public libraries were asked- What do you use the library for?  - The  most common reasons given for using the library (amongst users) probably unsurprisingly was for borrowing books, CDs, DVDs for themselves (70%) or with/for their children (35%).

 

Figure 2: What respondents to the 2015 Voicebox Survey said they used libraries for 19

How satisfied they are with the library service - When the users of public libraries were asked- Overall, how satisfied or dissatisfied are you with the library service? - 87% of public library users said they were satisfied with the library service (42% very satisfied, 45% fairly satisfied), only 2% were dissatisfied.

Why non-users do not use public libraries - When the non-users of public libraries were asked - Why do you not use public libraries? - Nearly half (48%) of non-users said they were not interested in using library services.  30% of non-users outlined additional reasons as to why they did not use public libraries, key reasons being that they bought books elsewhere or that they used the internet or e-books instead. 

Figure 3: Why respondents to the 2015 Voicebox Survey said they did not use public libraries  20

Click here to see further analysis of the results of the Public Libraries questions in the 2015 Voicebox Resident Survey 

2014 Voicebox Resident Survey - The Fashion Museum  21

The Voicebox Survey carried out in 2014 asked a series of questions about resident’s use, experience, interest and views with regards to fashion and the Fashion Museum in Bath:

  • The extent that it is a good thing to have the Fashion Museum
  • Interest in regular online features about fashion and fashion history
  • Last visit to the Fashion Museum
  • Reasons for not visiting the Fashion Museum more frequently
  • Interest in attending courses and lectures on fashion topics

The extent that it is a good thing to have the Fashion Museum - When respondents were asked - To what extent do you agree or disagree that it is a good thing to have the Fashion Museum in the district? - 

Figure 4: Respondents to the 2014 Voicebox Resident Survey that agree 22

Interest in regular online features about fashion and fashion history - When respondents were asked - Would you be interested in regularly updated features about fashion and fashion history online, with images from the museum collections? -

30% of those who responded (base -763) would be interested in regularly updated features about fashion and fashion history online.

A much greater proportion of women (31%) than men (17%) stated that they would be interested.

A greater proportion of 65+ year olds (27%) and 35-64 year olds (26%) than 18-35 year olds (16%) stated that they would be interested in regularly updated features about fashion and fashion history online.

Last visit to the Fashion Museum - When respondents were asked - When did you last visit the Fashion Museum? –

Just under half (47%) respondents had never visited the Fashion Museum (base 967).

Only 16% of respondents had visited the Fashion Museum within the last year.

Figure 5: When respondents to the 2014 Voicebox Resident Survey last visited the Fashion Museum in Bath 23

A greater proportion of men (55%) than women (40%) stated that they had never visited the Fashion Museum. Hence, a smaller proportion of men (11%) had visited it within the last year (within last year/six months) than women (20%).

A greater proportion of 18-35 year olds (59%) than 35-64 year olds (46%) and 65+ year olds (37%) said they had never visited the Fashion Museum.

A slightly smaller proportion of 18-35 year olds (14%) and 35-64 year olds (14%) had visited it within the last year (within last year/six months) than 65+ year olds (16%).

It is though worth breaking down the 65+ year olds age group, as the age group with greatest proportion of respondents that had visited the Fashion Museum within the last year was 65-74 year olds (21%), closely followed by 75-84 year olds (18%), compared to only 10% of 85 + year olds, a smaller proportion than for 18-35 year olds. 

Reasons for not visiting the Fashion Museum more frequently - When respondents were asked - Do you have any particular reason for not visiting the Fashion Museum more frequently?

The main reason respondents gave for not visiting the Fashion Museum more frequently was because they are not interested in it (44%). There was though a considerable difference between men and women, with only 29% of women stating that they were not interested compared to 59% of men. 

Figure 6: Reasons for not visiting the Fashion Museum more frequently given by respondents to the 2014 Voicebox Resident Survey 24

Interest in attending courses and lectures on fashion topics - When respondents were asked - Would you be interested in attending any of the following on historic and contemporary fashion topics?

  • Block courses
  • Evening courses
  • Day courses
  • Lectures

The majority were not at all interested in attending any of the options listed, however …

  • 27% outlined they would be very/quite or might be interested in attending Lectures (22% men, 32% women , 25% 18-35 year olds, 29% 35-64 year olds, and 24% 65+ year olds)
  • 16% outlined they would be very/quite or might be interested in attending Day Courses (11% men, 21% women , 16% 18-35 year olds, 16% 35-64 year olds, and 13% 65+ year olds)
  • 18% outlined they would be very/quite or might be interested in attending Evening Courses ( 14% men, 21% women , 18% 18-35 year olds, 21% 35-64 year olds, and 11% 65+ year olds)
  • 12% outlined they would be very/quite or might be interested in attending Block Courses (11% men, 12% women , 14% 18-35 year olds, 12% 35-64 year olds, and 6% 65+ year olds).

2013 Voicebox Resident Survey - Heritage Services 2526

Bath’s World Heritage status

When the respondents were asked about how much they knew about Bath's World Heritage status:

  • Half (50%) of respondents outlined they knew a bit about Bath’s World Heritage status
  • Just under a quarter (23%) outlined they knew a lot or had in-depth knowledge about it.
  • A fifth (20%) knew a little about it and the remaining 6% outlined they had never heard of it.

The respondents were then asked if they were Interested in finding out more about Bath’s Heritage status. 83% of respondents outlined some level of interest with regards finding out more about Bath’s World Heritage status (12% very interested, 29% quite interested, 42% might be interested) Only 17% outlined they were not interested at all.

Discovery Card

Council Discovery Cards give free admission or concessions to holders for many museums and heritage attractions in Bath and North East Somerset.

  • Just under half (47%) of respondents outlined they currently have a Discovery Card.
  • Of those respondents who do not currently have a Discovery Card, about half (51%) had heard about them but did not know about their benefits and about half (49%) had never heard of them.
  • 83% of those respondents who do not currently have a Discovery Card would like to get one.

2011, 2013 and 2015 Voicebox Resident Surveys - Leisure time 27 28 29

Amount of leisure time

In 2015 and 2013 respondents were asked how much leisure time they had per week. In both 2015 and 2013 a very similar proportion of respondents stated that they had more than five hours of leisure time per week, 62% in 2015 and 61% in 2013.  However, though the vast majority of respondents in both 2015 and 2013 stated that they had two or more hours of leisure time a week the proportion decreased, from 94% in 2013 to 87% in 2015.  

The amount of leisure time per week Voicebox respondents stated they had in 2013 was also looked at by age.

The age category with greatest proportion of respondents that stated they had more than five hours of leisure time was the 65-74 year olds (74%), followed by 75-84 year olds (65%) and 55-64 year olds (61%).  Overall a greater proportion of the older age groups stated that they had more than five hours of leisure time, 66% of 55-85+ year olds, compared to 50% of the 18-55 year olds.

Very small proportions of respondents in all age categories stated that they had less than hour of leisure time. The age categories with greatest proportion of respondents that stated they had less than one hour of leisure time were the 25-34 year olds (5%), and 35-44 year olds (5%).

 In 2011 the respondents were asked how much leisure time they had per day.

The figure below indicates that almost half the respondents stated that they had more than 5 hours of free time a day at weekends. Over a third of respondents stated they had between 2 and 4 hours of free time per day during the week. 42.2% of respondents indicated that they had less than 2 hours of leisure time per day. 

Leisure Time Graph

Figure 7: Number of hours of leisure time respondents of the 2011 Voicebox stated they had per day during the week and at weekends

How people spend their leisure time

In 2015, 2013 and 2011 the three top leisure activities respondents stated they spent their time doing 'almost every day’ or ‘at least once a week’ were the same:

  • watching TV/films at home
  • use of internet/online social networks
  • reading/writing

But in 2015 physical leisure activities moved into joint third place with reading/writing.

Figure 8: How Voicebox respondents said they currently spent their leisure time (2011, 2013 and 2015) 

Reasons for participating in leisure activities

In 2015, 2013 and 2011 respondents to the Voicebox Survey were asked to rate to what extent they look for certain factors or attributes in a leisure activity (from a prompted list).

Fun and relaxation/comfort were the most popular factors that respondents said they looked for a lot in leisure activities in 2015, 2013 and 2011:

  • Fun – 55% in 2015, 50% in 2013 and 45% in 2011
  • Relaxation/comfort – 50% in 2015, 39& in 2013 and 42% in 2011.

The other top factors that the respondents said they looked for 'a lot' in leisure activities in 2015, 2013 and 2011 were similar, but with some variation in the order of their popularity.

Table 1: The top factors that Voicebox respondents said they looked for 'a lot' in leisure activities in 2015, 2013 and 2011.

Figure 9: The top factors that Voicebox respondents said they looked for 'a lot' in leisure activities in 2015, 2013 and 2011.

In 2011 demographic analysis revealed that:

  • The 18-34 sub-group were most likely to place higher value on factors such as amusement/humour, relaxation/comfort, eating and drinking, being entertained and trying something new or different in their choice of leisure activity. 
  • Personal development scored highly amongst the 25-34 sub-group
  • Being outdoors scored more strongly with middle to older age sub-groups (45-74s) and with males in 2011.  Males also tended to score physical exercise higher. 
  • Females put more emphasis on eating and drinking than males
  • Something for all the family scored highly amongst the key target ages of 25-44s and higher amongst females than males.

Influencing factors in choosing a leisure activity

In 2015, 2013 and 2011 the cost of tickets/entry charges is the factor (from a prompted list) rated highest by respondents overall in influencing how they spend their leisure time, with 57% saying it influenced them a lot in 2015, 58% in 2013 and 54% in 2011.

In 2015, 2013 and 2011 travel and parking were also seen as key factors; with at least 38% of respondents outlining the following factors influenced their decisions ‘a lot’:

  • ease of parking  - 47% in 2015, 51% in 2013 and 38% in 2011
  • ease and distance of travel - 47% in 2015, 47% in 2013 and 42% in 2011
  • cost of parking -  41% in 2015, 49% in 2013 and 40% in 2011
  • and cost of travel -  41% in 2015, 46% in 2013 and 42% in 2011.

Finding out about leisure activities

In 2015 and 2013 respondents were asked how they found out about leisure activities. Word of mouth/personal recommendations, internet/online social networking and reviews/features in newspapers or magazines were the most popular ways respondents said they found out ‘a lot’ about leisure activities:

  • word of mouth/personal recommendation – 44% in 2015 and 43% in 2013
  • internet/online social networking – 43% in 2015 and 37% in 2013
  • reviews/features in newspapers or magazines – 20% in 2015 and 26% in 2013.

2012 Voicebox Resident Survey - Local events and the London 2012 Olympic Games  30

The Voicebox Survey carried out in 2012 asked a couple of questions relating to local events primarily linked to the 2012 London Olympic Games and the Queen’s Jubilee. A total of 850 residents completed the questionnaire, a response rate of 27%.

It is important to note that these results are weighted by gender, employment and tenure and exclude non-responses.

Events

It began by asking respondents whether they were aware of the following events in 2012 and whether they attended or enjoyed the events:

  • New Year’s Eve Fireworks (Bath)
  • Olympic Rings World Record Attempt
  • Olympic Torch Relay Day
  • Sky Ride cycling event
  • Picnic in the Park for the Diamond Jubilee (Bjorn Again headlining) Paralympics Flame Celebration Day
  • Rio Carnival parade
  • Gold Challenge
  • Quest Project
  • Art at the Edge
  • Graham Dean: Faster, Higher, Stronger – Olympics themed exhibition at Victoria Art Gallery
  • Sport and Fashion exhibition at Fashion Museum
  • Olympics talks series at Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution (BRLSI)

The event that the greatest proportion of respondents attended was the Olympic Torch Relay, with 14%, and 79% of those that attended said that they had enjoyed it.

The event with the second greatest proportion of respondents that attended was the Art at the Edge, outdoor sculptures of Athletes, an exhibition that had been present the entire year, 7% of respondents attended and of those that attended 89% said that they enjoyed it.

Overall most people said that they enjoyed the events that they attended.

The event which the greatest number of respondents had been aware of but did not attend was the Picnic in the Park for the Diamond Jubilee, 56% of respondents had been aware of it, but only 5% attended.

The event which respondents were least aware of was the Quest Project, 83% of the respondents had been unaware of the event, and only 2% of respondents had attended it.

Sources of information

Respondents were also asked about how they find out about events happening in Bath and North East Somerset.

The sources of information they were asked about were:

The options they were given in order to establish the extent to which respondents used these various sources were:

  • Daily
  • At least once a week
  • Once or twice a month
  • Less than once a month
  • Only when I want to book tickets
  • Never used

The sources of information used most often by respondents (by combining those sources of information which respondents stated that they use daily, at least once a week, once or twice a month or less than once a month) were:

  • local magazines (67%)
  • the Council Connect Magazine (63%)
  • printed leaflets (54%).

In terms of the sources of information most used by respondents on a daily basis, these were television and radio, with 11% and 10% respectively.

Not surprisingly, the main sources of information which respondents only used when they wanted to book tickets was the Bath Box Office, with 23%, and the website of the venue or event, with 22%.

There were a few sources of information that most respondents had not used for finding out about local event:

  • 97% of respondents had not used the Listomania website 
  • 96% had never used Twitter
  • 91% had never used Facebook

Flags and bunting

Lastly, respondents were asked about the flags and bunting that had been put up by the Council to celebrate the London Olympic Games and Paralympic Games:

  • 60% of respondents were aware of the flags and bunting,
  • 65% of respondents liked the flags and bunting
  • 62% of respondents would like to see decorations like this more often.

In comparison, far less respondents were not aware of the flags and bunting, just 24% of respondents, and only 10% disliked them and just 5% stated they would not like to see decorations like this more often.


The Audience Agency data 2009-1231

The Audience Agency report draws together results from 3 studies conducted for B&NES council from 2009-2012. These were an analysis of box office data for 5 festivals, a review of audience cross-over between festivals and venues and an analysis of box office data for 9 organisations.

Overall, the data provided an insight into the audiences of 12 organisations across Bath including theatres, concert halls, arts centres and film festivals.

The key findings were;

  • Audiences are shared across venues at the level of higher socio-economic groups, rather than at the level of individual customers.
  • Cultural audiences are largely wealthier people
  • There are significantly more people of this demographic in the local area than currently engage in culture
  • Some organisations are significantly better than others at meeting the needs of their customer groups
  • This suggests an unmet need in providing more accessible cultural activities to less wealthy individuals and families.

Heritage Survey 201232

This section provides an overview of public attitudes to local heritage and the historic environment through a mixture of street and venue surveys collected during Heritage Open week October – November 2012;

 748 responses were collected. 60% of these were over 45 years old and 18% were under 30 years old.

  • The majority of respondents (45%) did not choose a single heritage highlight and gave multiple answers.
  • 35% chose museums as the local highlight, with the Roman Baths at 24%.
  • Bath Abbey was the favourite building with 141 responses. Also popular were the Royal Crescent, Roman Baths and Assembly rooms and Circus.
  • 60% of respondents chose a favourite area/place from the natural environment in B&NES (i.e. green spaces and heritage landscape).
  • 90% of people felt it highly important or important that local heritage is preserved and looked after.
  • 71 % spoke very positively about Bath’s status as a World Heritage Site.

Are we meeting the needs?33

As a local authority, we target grant-funding and contracts to those cultural organisations [service providers] which can demonstrate inclusion and accessibility in their approach to their service.  We ensure that we fund a spread of organisations across the district so that residents in more rural areas and the smaller urban settlements are able to access cultural activity.

Service providers – those in receipt of grant-funding or contracts are monitored against funding agreements to achieve agreed outputs and outcomes.  All cultural organisations are directly involved in the creation and agreement of strategy (Cultural Strategy 2011-26; Library strategy; Arts Development Strategy34) and are fully consulted about grants schemes and priorities (Arts Development, Heritage services).

Take-up by lower socio-economic groups remains low. Some arts organisations, museums and libraries [service providers] have developed models of community engagement which bring in customers/users from groups which traditionally do not engage. Some of these have had good successes but on a limited scale. Other organisations have been less interested to adopt these approaches. 

Purple Flag35

  • In January 2010 Bath and North East Somerset was the first Local Authority in the South West to be awarded a Purple Flag by the Association of Town Centre Management.
  • The award also acknowledges the diversity of entertainment and hospitality that Bath has to offer.
  • This city centre has World Heritage Site status and is a major centre for tourism. The city has a wealth of high quality eateries, bars, museums and theatres and a variety of shops including many independent retailers. A diverse blend of entertainment, venues and activities can be found to interest a wide range of visitors. It has an exceptional offering of both traditional and contemporary art galleries. The city hosts a number of seasonal events including the Comedy Festival, Bath in Fashion and the International Music Festival which provide an added draw to the city. The city centre as a night time destination offers a thriving mixed use district, where a broad range of people can visit to enjoy the convivial atmosphere.
  • 1. Historic England (2016) Historic England Research, https://historicengland.org.uk/research/  (Viewed 02/12/2016)
  • 2. Bath Tourism Plus (2010) Tourism industry in Bath & tourism statistics http://visitbath.co.uk/media/information-sheets/btp-and-tourism-industry
  • 3. Bird, S. (14 August 2013) Email response to a data request, The Council's museum visitor numbers, Head of Heritage Services, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 4. Demographic group descriptions http://www.abc1demographic.co.uk
  • 5. The Audience Agency, Overview of Audience Data Work 2009-12 for Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 6. Bath and North East Somerset Council (2011) Leisure and Culture JSNA update, in-house information
  • 7. Harvey, S.B. et al. (2010) Physical activity and common mental disorders, BJPsych 197:357-364
  • 8. Bath and North East Somerset Council (2010) Voicebox 17 results, in-house analysis
  • 9. ONS Marriages in England and Wales dataset 2001-2010 and population estimates. Analysis provided by The Wedding Secret
  • 10. Review and evaluation of Olympics, Paralympics and Cultural Olympiad events and projects 2012 - http://democracy.bathnes.gov.uk/documents/s25098/Appx%201%20Olympics%20Review.pdf 
  • 11. Bath and North East Somerset Council (2011) Voicebox 20 survey results, in-house analysis
  • 12. rmg clarity (2013) Bath and North East Somerset – Voicebox 21 Local Events and the Olympics Report, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 13.  Marketing Means (2014) Voicebox 22, Section 2: Heritage Services - Headline Draft Report, Bath and North East Somerset Council, November 2013 – January 2014
  • 14.  Marketing Means (2015) Voicebox 23, Results weighted by Age and Gender, Bath and North East Somerset Council, November 2014 – January 2015
  • 15. Marketing Means (2016) Bath and North East Somerset Voicebox 24, Public Libraries Report, Bath and North East Somerset Council - November 2015-January 2016
  • 16. Marketing Means (2016) Bath and North East Somerset Voicebox 24, Public Libraries Report, Bath and North East Somerset Council - November 2015-January 2016
  • 17. Marketing Means (2016) Voicebox 24, Results weighted by Age and Gender, Bath and North East Somerset Council, November 2015 – January 2016
  • 18. Marketing Means (2016) Bath and North East Somerset Voicebox 24, Public Libraries Report, Bath and North East Somerset Council - November 2015-January 2016
  • 19. Marketing Means (2016) Bath and North East Somerset Voicebox 24, Public Libraries Report, Bath and North East Somerset Council - November 2015-January 2016
  • 20. Marketing Means (2016) Bath and North East Somerset Voicebox 24, Public Libraries Report, Bath and North East Somerset Council - November 2015-January 2016
  • 21.  Marketing Means (2015) Voicebox 23, Results weighted by Age and Gender, Bath and North East Somerset Council, November 2014 – January 2015
  • 22.  Marketing Means (2015) Voicebox 23, Results weighted by Age and Gender, Bath and North East Somerset Council, November 2014 – January 2015
  • 23.  Marketing Means (2015) Voicebox 23, Results weighted by Age and Gender, Bath and North East Somerset Council, November 2014 – January 2015
  • 24.  Marketing Means (2015) Voicebox 23, Results weighted by Age and Gender, Bath and North East Somerset Council, November 2014 – January 2015
  • 25. Bath and North East Somerset Council (2011) Voicebox 20 survey results, in-house analysis
  • 26.  Marketing Means (2014) Voicebox 22, Section 2: Heritage Services - Headline Draft Report, Bath and North East Somerset Council, November 2013 – January 2014
  • 27. Bath and North East Somerset Council (2011) Voicebox 20 survey results, in-house analysis
  • 28. Marketing Means (2014) Voicebox 22, Section 3: Leisure time - Headline Draft Report, Bath and North East Somerset Council, November 2013 – January 2014
  • 29.  Marketing Means (2016) Bath and North East Somerset Voicebox 24, Leisure Time Report, Bath and North East Somerset Council - November 2015-January 2016
  • 30. rmg clarity (2013) Bath and North East Somerset – Voicebox 21 Local Events and the Olympics Report, Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 31. The Audience Agency, Overview of Audience Data Work 2009-12 for Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • 32. 2012 People’s survey of Local Heritage  - in house analysis
  • 33. Bath and North East Somerset Council (2011) Leisure and Culture JSNA update, in-house information
  • 34. http://www.bathnes.gov.uk/sites/default/files/culture_strategy_2011-26.pdf
  • 35. Purple Flag (downloaded 12/3/2012) Bath http://www.purpleflag.org.uk/projects/bath-1.html