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Related to: Emotional Health and Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Child Health and Wellbeing Survey , Socio-economic Inequality, Child Poverty, Education, Employment and Economic Activity, Not in Education, Employment or Training, Homelessness, Sexual Orientation, Crime and Disorder, Safeguarding Children and Young People, Carers, Service Use and Quality of Care, Physical Activity, Healthy Weight, Smoking, AlcoholIll Health and Disability, Vaccine Preventable Infections, Unintentional Injuries,Road Traffic Collisions, Sensory Impairments, Learning Disabilities, Mental Health and Illness, Eating Disorders, Play and Play Areas, Wellbeing, Internet Access, Oral Health , Early Help for Children and Young People, Autism, Anxiety and DepressionAttention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Substance Misuse, Food Poverty

Key Facts

  • Nearly 1 in 5 (19%) of children in B&NES live in poverty (after housing costs are taken into account).
  • Children on Free School Meals in B&NES are significantly lower performing than nationally for English and Maths.
  • Public Health England has estimated that 8.4% of children and young people aged 5-16 years in Bath and North East Somerset in 2013 had a mental health illness.  This is similar to the 2013 estimates for England (9.6%) and the South West (8.9%).
  • Rates of mental health related outpatient attendances for children and adolescents in Bath and North East Somerset were above national and regional averages in 2009/10 and 2010/11.
  • In 2012/13 in B&NES 55% of looked after children (44 children) eligible children for an emotional well-being assessment had a score that was considered to be of concern. This was higher than in 2011/12, when it was 50%, and significantly higher than the 2012/13 proportions for the South West (44%) and England (38%).
  • 50% of homelessness applications in Bath and North East Somerset are from people aged under 25.
  • There has been a decrease in the rate of children and young people (under 18 years) hospital alcohol specific admissions in B&NES (from 86 per 100,000 population aged under 18 years in 2008/09-2010/11 to 68 in 2010/11-2012/13), but it remains significantly higher than the rate for the South West (51) and England (42).
  • The outcomes for young people in substance misuse treatment are better than national – with 94 percent successfully completing treatment during 2013/14, compared to 79 percent nationally.  Furthermore, successful substance misuse treatment appears to be long-lasting, with very few clients re-presenting into adult treatment – during 2012/13-2013/14, 10 out of 80 clients re-presented to the adult drug treatment service following a successful exit from the young person’s treatment service.
  • The percentage of school children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in B&NES is higher than the regional average and is in the second highest quintile nationally (8% B&NES, 6% nationally).

Information about organisations and events in Bath and North East Somerset, Bristol and South Gloucestershire that support families on a range of issues such as childcare, parenting, benefits and school can be found on the 

Bathnes 1 Big Database.  

What does the data say?

In a study of children’s well-being in 25 European countries, the UK was ranked 21st, scoring badly for relationships with parents and peers, health, relative poverty; up to 1 in 12 British children deliberately hurt themselves on a regular basis, the highest rate in Europe; 20% of children and young people in the UK have mental health problems at some point, and 1 in 10 has a clinically recognisable mental health disorder. 1

Bath and North East Somerset

The 2011 census shows that 16.7% (29,577) of the population of Bath and North East Somerset are 15 years or under, and that 6.3% (11,211) are 16-19 year olds.

According to the Department of Education in the financial year 2012/13 Bath and North East Somerset spent £6,589 on Local Authority children and young people's services (excluding education) per 10,000 children aged under 18 years, slightly lower than the rates for the South West as a whole (£7,315) and England (£7,778). 2

The Department of Education has also stated that in the financial year 2012/13 Bath and North East Somerset spent £804 on Sure Start Children's Centres and early years expressed per 10,000 children aged under 18 years, slightly lower than the rate for the South West as a whole (£1,180) and England (£1,045). 3

For the results of the Child Health and Wellbeing Survey see Child Health and Wellbeing Survey section.

Socio-economic Inequality 4 5 6

Locally, we have seen that socio-economic inequality is related to a wide range of health and wellbeing factors throughout someone’s life.

Factors affected by socio-economic inequalities particularly impacting on pre-birth and the early stages of life locally are:

In terms of deprivation overall, five areas of Bath and North East Somerset are within the most notable 20% of the country across a range of data:

  • Twerton West
  • Whiteway
  • Twerton
  • Fox Hill North
  • Whiteway West

Whiteway (Southdown Ward) is in the most notable 1% for Education, Skills and Training and Whiteway West (Twerton ward) and Fox Hill North (Combe Down ward) are in the most notable 10% for Education, Skills and Training.

Child Poverty

  • Approximately 11% (3,790 children) of dependent children in Bath and North East Somerset lived in low income families as at 31st August 2013 - lower than national (19%) and regoinal (15%).  This also compares to 13% in North Somerset and 11% in Wiltshire
  • This figure increases to approximately 19% when housing costs are taken into consideration
  • Child poverty is estimated to cost £44m in Bath and North East Somerset
  • There are wide variations in the child poverty figures across different wards and LSOAs in Bath and North East Somerset

Education 7

It is estimated that in 2014 in B&NES there was a total of 2,407 primary, secondary and special school children claiming free school meals (9.6% of pupils), lower than the proportion in the South West as a whole (12.3%) and England (16.3%). 8

8.2% of primary school aged children have special educational needs, slightly higher than national rates. Alternatively, 4.8% of secondary school children have special educational needs or are on Schools Action Plus, which is significantly lower than national rates.

In 2014 it is estimated that in B&NES there was a total of 592 primary, secondary and special school children identified as having a learning disability (2.02% of pupils), slightly lower than the proportion in the South West as a whole (2.37%) and England (2.87%). 9

It is estimated that in 2014 in B&NES there was a total of 465 primary, secondary and special school children identified as having speech, language or communication needs (1.59% of pupils) , slightly lower than the proportion in the South West as a whole (1.64%) and England (1.67%). 10

Education Attainment 11

According to the Department of Education in the financial year 2012/13, 50.7% of eligible children in Bath and North East Somerset were defined as having reached a good level of development at the end of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS), slightly lower than the rates for the South West as a whole (55.6%) and England (51.7%). 12

79% of primary school children in B&NES achieved level 4 in reading, writing and maths in 2013. This was higher than the national rate.

In 2013 63.6% of secondary school children in B&NES achieved 5+ A*-Cs GCSEs (or equivalent - including English and Maths). This was higher than national rate.  

74.2% of the A-Level students in B&NES in 2013 achieved 3 or more A-Levels at A*-E, this was lower than the national rate of 80.5%.

62.9% of the key stage 5 vocational students in B&NES in 2013 achieved 2 or more substantial vocational qualifications, this was lower than the national rate of 69.9%.

Children on free school meals in Bath and North East Somerset between Key Stage 1 and 2 were significantly lower performing than national for English and Maths (82% - 87% English & 78% - 83% Maths). 13

Educational achievement is strongly linked to Sex and Gender and Socio-economic Inequality.

Not in Education, Employment or Training

4.4% (197) of young people in B&NES were NEET in December 2012 14

NEET numbers are expected to continue to increase whilst job opportunities are limited

Connexions monitors 3 groups of young people considered to be particularly vulnerable; teenage mothers, those with learning disabilities and 19yr old care leavers.

  • From December 2011 to December 2012, the numbers of teenage mothers NEET has increased from 59% to 64%.
  • Figures for 19 yr. olds leaving care are far more volatile, however numbers in Education Employment or Training have increased significantly from 55.6% (Dec 2011) to 75% (Dec 2012) while numbers of NEET have decreased from 44.4% (Dec 2011) to 16.7% (Dec 2012).
  • There are clear clusters of NEET young people in particular wards in the Bath, Chew Valley/Keynsham and the Peasedown/Radstock areas: Numbers have risen in the Bath area and fallen in the North East Somerset area 15

Analysis in July 2011 highlighted the following further risk factors:

  • Young people who are unable to work due to illness (currently 12, which is an exceptionally high figure)
  • Young people who are very difficult to engage
  • Strong association with social inequality 16

Employment and Economic Activity 17

According to the 2011 Census in B&NES 2.7% of households with dependent children had no adult in employment, this is significantly lower than the South West (3%) and England (4.2%).

Homelessness

Young people are at particular risk of homelessness and 50% of homelessness applications in Bath and North East Somerset are from people aged under 25.18

60% homeless applications in Q3 2011/12 had dependent children or were pregnant. 19

Sexual Orientation

There is a body of evidence that LGB&T identification occurs in many people in childhood, and many children experience bullying and harassment in schools which can be a significant cause of persistent absenteeism: 20

  • Over half of secondary school pupils are victims of homophobic bullying in schools. 46% of lesbian and gay pupils don’t feel able to be themselves at school, and 21% do not feel safe or accepted at school.
  • More than 2 in 5 LGB pupils who experience homophobic bullying skip school because of it.

Over half (56%) of LGB young people have deliberately harmed themselves. Self-harm is directly linked with experience of homophobic bullying. 21

As many as 1 in 3 homeless youth are LGB&T. 22

LGB homeless youth may experience additional challenges because of their sexual orientation, and there is evidence that some young people become homeless because they, or their families, are unable to deal with them being LGB. 23

Police Assessments

There were 130 Juvenile First Time Entrants into the Criminal Justice System in Bath and North East Somerset in 2010-2011, this equates to 800 per every 100,000 10-17 year olds. This was a 20% reduction from 2009-10. 24

Hate Crime and Hate Incidents

34% of victims of hate crimes and incidents in Bath and North East Somerset have been recorded as being under 25, with the majority being male. 25

Over half of recorded hate crimes and hate incidents locally have been committed by offenders who were under 25, with nearly three quarters of known offenders being male. Most offenders in Bath and North East Somerset have been classified as “White British”. 26

Safeguarding Children and Young People

There are approximately [[Children and Young People Safeguarding Referrals and Assessment| 1,100 referrals to children’s social care services a year]]. 27

In Bath and North East Somerset in 2012/13 (financial year) there were 667 children and young people aged 0-17 years identified as 'in need' (Children in Need) per 10,000 children aged 0-17 (2,247 identifications). This was similar to the South West (640) and England (646). It is important to note that a child can have more than one episode of need throughout the year but episodes should not overlap. Therefore, if a child has more than one episode, then each is counted in the figures.

Rates of Child Protection Plans remain significantly lower than national and regional rates. 28

In 2013 in Bath and North East Somerset 89.3% of looked after children  were in foster placements (125 children). This was significantly higher than the South West (75.4%) and England (74.7%). 29

43% of children in care in Bath and North East Somerset are there due to their family being in acute stress or family dysfunction. This is double the percentage nationally where the most common reason for being in care is abuse or neglect. 30

In 2012/13 in B&NES 55% of looked after children (44 children) eligible children for an emotional well-being assessment had a score that was considered to be of concern. This was higher than in 2011/12, when it was 50%, and significantly higher than the 2012/13 proportions for the South West (44%) and England (38%). 31

During the seven year period between the financial years 2007/08 and 2013/14 Bath and North East Somerset (B&NES) Council received Early Help Common Assessment Framework (CAF) Assessments for 1,527 children and young people aged 0-19 years. Overall there has been an increase in the number of Early Help CAF Assessments carried out for children, received by B&NES Council over the seven year period.32

Carers

In 2012 there were 155 young carers registered with the Young Carers Service in Bath and North East Somerset (more thought to be unrecorded) 33 This is 0.52% of the 0-15 year population compared with 2.1% estimate nationally. 34 This could represent a lack of child carer identification within Bath and North East Somerset.

In a survey of school pupils 23% of secondary school respondents and 12% of primary school respondents said they cared for family members after school on the day before the survey. 35 This indicates a gap between carer’s and using services.

Service Use and Quality of Care

Children’s Care Services 36

Bath & North East Somerset Council

Safeguarding Inspection Outcome

Aggregated inspection finding

Overall effectiveness of the safeguarding services

Adequate

Capacity for improvement

Adequate

The contribution of health agencies to keeping children and young people safe

Inadequate

Looked After children Inspection Outcome

Aggregated inspection finding

Overall effectiveness of services for looked after children and young people

Good

Capacity for improvement of the council and its partners

Good

Being Healthy

Inadequate

Education 37

At 31/08/12, in terms of overall effectiveness 49% of pupils were educated in an outstanding school, 34% in a good school and 17% in a satisfactory school, there were no inadequate schools. This is better than both regional and national performance.

In our communities experiencing the greatest amount of socio-economic inequality, 46% of pupils are educated in satisfactory schools (compared to 41% educated in satisfactory or inadequate schools nationally), while 54% are educated in good schools.

Physical Activity

Bath and North East Somerset is significantly lower than the national average regarding the percentage of children participating in at least 3 hours per week of high quality PE and sport at school (age 5-18 years) (54%, nationally 55%, regionally 57%). 38

A survey carried out by the University of Bath (2011) indicates that parents have a significant effect on young people’s physical activity levels. Barriers identified included:

  • Fears of parenting skills being judged, not knowing other parents or workers attending play sessions
  • Cost
  • Lack of awareness of services
  • Parents tended to react badly to the receipt of information that their child was overweight. This appeared to stem from the perception that having an overweight child was equated with being a bad parent. From this survey a number of recommendations were made. 39

A consultation by a short breaks for disabled children scheme revealed the following barriers to physical activity by disabled children:

  • Concerns over transport and money
  • Quality of staff
  • Lack of knowledge of opportunities of Parents in mainstream schools. 40

Healthy Weight

  • 22.6% of Reception aged children (4 to 5 years old) in B&NES are an unhealthy weight, i.e. either overweight or obese.  7.4% of Reception aged children in B&NES are obese.
  • 27.9% of Year 6 aged children (10 to 11 years old) in B&NES are an unhealthy weight, i.e. either overweight or obese.  13.6% of Year 6 aged children in B&NES are obese.

Smoking

Nationally, smoking prevalence rates continue to fall and are now at their lowest level since at least 1982 - 23% of girls and 20% of boys reported they ever tried smoking in 2013.41

Secondary School surveys suggest that fewer children in years 8 and 10 have ever smoked in Bath and North East Somerset compared with the national average. However, the surveys also indicate that the percentage of occasional/regular smokers is in line with national average. 42

Substance Misuse and Alcohol 

The following document presents the findings of the needs assessment conducted across Bath and North East Somerset (B&NES) and reports on the future requirements for services for young people who are misusing substances, as well as those who are at risk of misusing substances.  The primary purpose of this needs assessment is to identify the needs of young people requiring specialist treatment for substance misuse.  It includes recommendations that not only addresses unmet treatment needs, it includes a review of early help and prevention.  The inclusion of early help and prevention provides a useful opportunity to better understand the pathways into treatment, wider workforce development and ensuring effective treatment for those that require it.

2015 Bath and North East Somerset Children and Young People’s Substance Misuse Needs Assessment

Teenage Conceptions

Teenage conception rates in Bath and North East Somerset are approximately 17 per 1,000 15-17 year old females, significantly lower than national (33 per 1,000) and regional (28 per 1,000) rates. In B&NES there has been a 44% reduction since the 1998 baseline. 43

49% of teenage mothers (16-19) are Not in Education Employment or Training (February 2012). 44

Vaccine Preventable Infections

In Bath and North East Somerset childhood immunisation rates are better than national rates and have also increased, from 84% in 2001/02 to 94% in 2011/12 (one dose) and from 78% to 88% for two doses (see figure 1). However, rates are still below the national target of 95%. 45

There is considerable variation in uptake rates of MMR vaccines between practices - lowest 71% uptake rate of 2 doses by 5thbirthday compared to highest of 92% (Hope House Surgery). 46

Unintentional Injuries

Overall rates of admissions for unintentional injuries in under 18s in Bath and North East Somerset have decreased from 2003 to 2012. 47

Wards with the highest rate of under 18 emergency admissions for injuries (08/09-10/11) are: Southdown (highest), Keynsham North, Chew Valley South, Publow and Whitchurch, Clutton and Twerton. 48

Overall there has been a slight increase over time of emergency hospital admissions for injuries of under 5s from 2003-2011 in Bath and North East Somerset.49

Odd Down (highest), Walcot, Radstock, Lambridge and Clutton have significantly high rates of emergency hospital admissions for injuries of under 5s 2006-11. 50

Road Traffic Collisions

23% of pedestrian accidents involve children. 51

13% of cycling accidents involve children.52

The rate per 1000 population of emergency hospital admissions in under 18s has fallen over the last 9 years. This reduction is also apparent in numbers of emergency admissions for road traffic collisions in under 5s. 53

Deaths from land traffic accidents in Bath and North East Somerset are disproportionately in young males. 54

Satisfaction with the safety of children cycling to school and road safety education is slightly below national average for both children cycling and walking to school and with respect to road safety training/education: 55

  • Safety of cycling – satisfied – 36%
  • Safety of children cycling to school – satisfied 30%
  • Safety of children walking to school – satisfied 44%

Sensory Impairments

Early onset of significant visual or hearing impairment can have a profound effect on a child’s development, with adverse consequences for mental health, both in childhood and adult life. 56

Hearing Impairment

There is 1% more children in primary school with SEN/ School Action Plus with hearing impairment in Bath and North East Somerset compared with nationally, however this is not seen at secondary school stage. 57

NDCS (National deaf children society) says that about 40% of deaf children develop mental health issues. 58

Reasons for an increased prevalence of mental health problems in deaf children: 59

  • An excess of organic problems (usually due to the cause of the deafness)
  • An excess of emotional, psychological and behavioural disorders
  • Delays in access to service, which increase the duration of mental health problems

A report called Hearing Matters; Action on Hearing Loss (2011) 60 found:

  • Hearing loss has significant personal and social costs and can lead to high levels of social isolation and consequent mental ill health. Children with hearing loss have an increased likelihood of suffering from depression.
  • Hearing loss has a significant impact on education and employment. In 2009 in England, 71% of deaf children failed to achieve the government benchmark of five GCSEs at grades A* to C, including English and Maths

The 2010 Secondary School Young Parliament revealed that children and young people feel that it is important for everybody to learn to sign in order to improve communication between adults and young people. 61

Visual Impairment

There is 1% more children with Special Educational Needs (SEN)/ School Action Plus in secondary school due to visual impairment in Bath and North East Somerset compared with nationally. 62

Up to half of children who are blind from birth have other disabilities that can limit their potential. 63The Sensory Support Service work to prevent this.

Learning Disabilities

It is estimated that in 2014 in B&NES there was a total of 592 primary, secondary and special school children identified as having a learning disability (2.02% of pupils), slightly lower than the proportion in the South West as a whole (2.37%) and England (2.87%). 64

Children with learning disabilities have a shorter life expectancy than other people. They also have poorer physical and mental health. 65

Rates of respiratory disease are much higher for children with learning disabilities. 66

Children with Down’s syndrome are at particularly high risk of leukaemia compared to the general population, and almost half of all people with Down’s syndrome are affected by congenital heart defects. 67

The prevalence of psychiatric disorders is 36% among children with learning disabilities, compared to 8% among children without learning disabilities nationally. 68

Children with learning disabilities account for 14% of all British children with a diagnosable psychiatric disorder. Increased prevalence of psychiatric disorder is particularly marked for autistic spectrum disorder.69

Autism

According to the Department of Education in 2014 in Bath and North East Somerset 0.97% of primary, secondary and special school pupils were identified as having an Autism Spectrum Disorder. This is similar to England (0.91%), but significantly higher than the South West (0.83%). 70

Local data however suggests that the percentages are considerably greater than those outlined by the Department of Education. Local data states that in 2013 the percentage of school children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in Bath & North East Somerset was 8%, higher than the regional average and in the second highest quintile nationally (6% nationally). 71

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Applying the estimated prevalence percentage of Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (13.8%) from the the national 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (APMS) to the resident population aged 16-24, Public Health England has estimated that in 2013 there were 4,080 16-24 year olds in Bath and North East Somerset with ADHD. 72

Mental Health and Illness

Many mental illnesses are common and often start in childhood,10% of children have a mental illness. 73

Using the prevalence from the ONS 2004 Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain survey, adjusting for age, sex and socio-economic classification and mid-year population estimates, Public Health England has estimated that 8.4% of children and young people aged 5-16 years in Bath and North East Somerset in 2013 had a mental health illness. This is similar to the 2013 estimates for England (9.6%) and the South West (8.9%). 74

In terms of child and young people (0-17 years) hospital inpatient admissions for mental health disorders, in the financial year 2012/13, in Bath and North East Somerset there were 53.2 per 100,000 population aged 0-17 years. This was significantly lower than the rate for the South West (89.7) and England (87.6) during the same period. 75

However, rates of mental health related outpatient attendances for children and adolescents in Bath and North East Somerset were above national and regional averages in 2009/10 and 2010/11. 76

Psychological Therapies in Bath and North East Somerset have seen a noticeable rise in referrals for service users aged 18-25. 77

Children and young people in B&NES requiring Child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) 78 – Based on the 2012 CCG General Practice (GP) registered patient counts an estimate was developed as to the proportion of children and young people aged 17 years and under who may experience mental health problems appropriate to a response from CAMHS Tiers 1 to 4 (see Mental Health and Illness section for definitions) nationally.  When this proportion was applied to the B&NES 2012 mid-year population estimate, it suggested that in B&NES in 2012 there were approximately 630 children and young people aged 17 years and under who required Tier 3 CAMHS, and 30 who required Tier 4 CAMHS. It is important to note that these estimates do not make any adjustment for local characteristics which may impact on need for services.

Anxiety and Depression

Using the prevalence from the ONS 2004 Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain survey, adjusting for age, sex and socio-economic classification and mid-year population estimates, Public Health England has estimated that 3.3% of children and young people aged 5-16 years in Bath and North East Somerset in 2013 had an emotional disorder (anxiety disorders and depression). This is similar to the 2013 estimates for England (3.7%) and the South West (3.5%). 79

Eating Disorders

At least 1.1 million people in the UK are affected by an eating disorder, with young people in the age-group 14-25 being most at risk of developing this type of illness. 80

Based on the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey and the Bath and North East Somerset 16-24 resident population, it is estimated that in 2013 there were 3,879 young people aged 16-24 in B&NES with an eating disorder. 81

The number of admissions for eating disorders in Bath and North East Somerset has increased although this may be due to changes in diagnosis rather than an actual increase in prevalence. Highest prevalence is in 16-24 year old girls. 82

Play and Play Areas 83 84 85

Evidence indicates that Bath and North East Somerset's Play Pathfinder Programme both directly and through the work of the Play Rangers has improved equalities amongst children by:

  • Providing wide spread opportunities for children and parents to feel safe in a local open space which will have consequences for their physical fitness and opportunities to play outside.
  • Improving emotional health and well-being and increasing social, communication and life skills of children from a wide range of backgrounds.
  • Helping children to feel safe from bullying and discrimination through support and care for each other.
  • Giving parents/ carers opportunities to meet others in similar situations helping them develop social networks and reduce their isolation.
  • Helping children and young people socialise and make new friends, building bridges across social divides and increases sense of belonging/social cohesion

What does the community say?

The Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey 86  87  88  89

The Health-Related Behaviour Survey developed by the Schools Health Education Unit is designed for young people of primary and secondary school age. The surveys have been developed by health and education professionals, and cover a wide range of topics. Data arising from the survey can be used to help inform planning and policy decisions as well being used in the classroom as the stimulus for discussion with young people. These surveys are carried out every two years.

When considering the results of the Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey in B&NES it is worth bearing in mind the level of participation in the survey, and thus how representative the responses are likely to be of children in B&NES as a whole.

 

Primary schools that participated

Total number of primary schools

Primary school response rate

Secondary schools  that participated

Total number of secondary schools

Secondary school response rate

2011

27

54

50%

10

13

77%

2013

21

54

39%

11

13

85%

Table 2: Levels of school participation in the Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey in B&NEs in 2011 and 2013

Column1

2011

2013

Primary school respondents (Year 4 and 6)

1359

1222

Year 4 and 6 pupils in participating schools

1755

1363

Year 4 and 6 response rate in participating schools

77%

90%

 

 

 

Secondary school respondents (Year 8 and 10)

2169

2617

Year 8 and 10 pupils in participating schools

3038

3373

Year 8 response rate in participating schools

71%

78%

 

 

 

Table 3: Levels of pupil participation in the schools taking part in the Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey in B&NEs in 2011 and 2013

As well as the local B&NES results, some comparisons are made with national/aggregate figures from all the surveys conducted by the Schools Health Education Unit (SHEU) in the previous year from their publication “Young People into 2013”. The national sample used for the 2013 comparison consists of 43,014 young people aged 10 to 15.

For more information from the Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey you can click on the links below that will take you to the other topics that contain results from survey.

Other JSNA topics with results from the Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey:

Ethnicity, Sexual Orientation, Wellbeing, Ill Health and Disability, Asthma, Skin Cancer (Melanoma), Infectious Diseases and Pandemics, Unintentional Injuries, Road Traffic Collisions, Sexual Health, Contraception, Healthy Weight, Diet and Malnutrition, Physical Activity, Smoking, Alcohol, Substance Misuse, Education, Internet Access, Crime and Disorder, Oral Health

Family

In 2013 when primary school children in B&NES in year 4 and 6 were asked which adults they live with:

  • 73% of pupils responded that they live with their Mum and Dad together.
  • 14% of pupils responded that they live ‘mainly or only’ with their Mum, while 1% said they live ‘mainly or only’ with their Dad.

Unfortunately there was no national comparative data for this question.

In 2013 when secondary school children in B&NES in year 8 and 10 were asked which adults they live with:

  • 64% of pupils that responded said that they live with their mum and dad together, similar to the SHEU national rate of 62%.
  • 16% of pupils that responded said that they live ‘mainly or only’ with their mum (17% nationally), while 2% of pupils responded that they live ‘mainly or only’ with their dad.

Socio-economic Inequality - In order to acquire some idea if there were any differences from children that are likely to be from a more deprived background  the primary school children were asked if they had ever had free school meals, or vouchers for free school meals.

10% (116) of year 4 and 6 respondents in 2013 stated that they were receiving or eligible to receive free school meals.

A lower proportion of the primary school pupils eligible for free school meals (FSM) responded that they live with their Mum and Dad together, 43%, compared to the 76% of children that stated that they were not eligible for them.  Correspondingly, a higher proportion of the children said they were entiled to FSM responded: 90

  • that they live ‘mainly or only’ with their Mum, 35% compared to 12% of non FSM pupils,
  • that they live ‘mainly or only’ with their Dad, 3% compared to 1% of non FSM pupils.

When the primary school children were asked how many brothers and sisters they have 7% of pupils responded that they are an only child, while 20% said they have at least three siblings. These results were virtually the same as they were in 2011.

The Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey also tried to establish whether there were any differences between secondary school children that are likely to be from a more deprived background. To do this it found out the numbers of secondary school year 8 and 10 respondents that were eligible for the pupil premium.

The pupil premium is additional funding given to publicly funded schools in England to raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers.

Pupil premium funding is available to both mainstream and non-mainstream schools, such as special schools and pupil referral units. It is paid to schools according to the number of pupils who have been:

  • registered as eligible for free school meals at any point in the last 6 years
  • been in care for 6 months or longer 91

10% (247) of year 8 and 10 respondents in 2013 were eligible for the pupil premium.

A lower proportion of the secondary school pupils eligible the pupil premium (PP) responded that they live with their Mum and Dad together, 31%, compared to the 68% of children that were not eligible for them.  Correspondingly, a higher proportion of the children eligible for PP responded that they live ‘mainly or only’ with their Mum, 42% compared to 13% of non PP pupils.

Growing up

When the Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey in B&NES in 2013 asked primary school children in B&NES in year 4 and 6 whether they felt they knew enough about how their body changes as they get older:

  • 68% of pupils responded that they feel they know enough about how their body changes as they get older, while 6% feel they don’t know enough.

Bullying

The Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey in 2013 and 2011 asked primary school children in B&NES in year 4 and 6 a number of questions about bullying:

  • In both 2013 and 2011, 7% of pupils that responded stated that they felt afraid of going to school because of bullying ‘often’ or ‘very often’, this is very similar to the SHEU national rate of 6%.
  • In 2013 37% of pupils that responded said that they felt afraid of going to school because of bullying at least ‘sometimes’, this was virtually the same as in 2011, when it was 36%.
  • In both 2013 and 2011, 3% of pupils that responded that they think others may fear going to school because of them, this is the same as the SHEU national rate.
  • 27% of pupils that responded in 2013 said that they had been bullied at or near school in the last 12 months.
  • In 2013, 75% of pupils that responded stated that they thought their school took bullying seriously, while 12% did not think their school took bullying seriously. 
  • 74% of pupils responded that they have experienced at least one of the negative behaviours listed at least a ‘few times’ in the last month, while 25% said they have done so ‘often’ or ‘every day’.

The Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey in 2013 and 2011 asked secondary school children in B&NES in year 8 and 10 a number of questions about bullying:

  • In both 2011 and 2013 4% of pupils responded that they feel afraid of going to school because of bullying ‘often’ or ‘very often’, very similar to the national SHEU rate of 5%.
  • In 2013, 24% (22% in 2011) of pupils responded that they feel afraid of going to school because of bullying at least ‘sometimes’, very similar to the national SHEU rate of 22%.
  • 19% of pupils in 2013 responded that they had been bullied at or near school in the last 12 months (17% in 2011), lower than the national SHEU rate of 31%.  
  • In 2013, 5% of pupils responded that they had bullied someone else at school in the last 12 months (6% in 201), very similar to the national SHEU rate of 6%.
  • In 2013 17% of pupils did not think that their school took bullying seriously (15% in 2011).

A higher proportion of the secondary school pupils eligible the pupil premium (PP) responded that they felt afraid of going to school because of bullying at least ‘sometimes, 34% compared to 23% of non PP pupils. 92

The Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey in 2013 and 2011 also asked primary school children in B&NES in year 4 and 6 about whether they had experienced any of the following negative behaviours in the last month:

  • Been teased/made fun of
  • Called nasty names
  • Bullied on my mobile phone
  • Bullied through e-mail/Internet
  • Pushed/hit for no reason
  • Had belongings taken/broken
  • Been threatened for no reason
  • Been threatened for money
  • Been ganged up on
  • Been called gay

In 2013, 25% of pupils that responded said that they had experienced at least one of the negative behaviours listed in the last month, ‘often’ or ‘every day’, 23% in 2011. A far greater proportion stated that they had experienced these negative behaviours at least a ‘few times’ in the last month, 74% in 2013, slight increase compared to 2011 when it was 70%.

Strangers

When the Child Health-Related Behaviour Survey in 2013 and 2011 asked primary school children in B&NES in year 4 and 6 whether they had ever been approached by an adult stranger who scared or upset them:

  • In 2013, 21% (22% in 2011) of pupils responded that they had been approached by an adult who scared or upset them, slightly less than the national SHEU rate of 24%.

Short Breaks for Disabled Children consultation July 2013 93

In July 2013, a needs analysis was commissioned for the purposes of re-commissioning the short breaks for disabled children services in 2014. Views were sought from parents, carers, disabled young people and providers. This needs assessment included a several targetted questionnaires, focus groups and consultation with the Youth Parliament.

Key findings;

Parent's/Carers

  • Over half (53%) of respondents said they preferred an environment with mixed disabled and non-disabled children
  • 63% stated that thier family does access short break opportunities
  • Feedback suggests that parents/carers in special schools are much more likely to be aware of the short breaks service
  • Parental confidence in the quality and ability to meet individual needs is paramount in encouraging children to use the service
  • 47% said they were willing to contribute towards transport costs
  • 92% thought thier local area was a safe place for children to grow up in
  • When asked which 3 things would make the biggest difference to a child or young persons life - 21% stated more safe places, 13% having adults that listen, 12% having parents that spend time with them and 10% having more organised activities and things to do
  • Use of direct payments and personalised budgets weere seen in a positive light, especially to reduce repetition of information

Children and Young People

  • 67% already attend a range of activities in thier free time
  • Children and Young People like staff who are known to them and understand thier individual needs
  • 65% said that adult support is an important factor in undertaking activities, while 61% also rated cost/money as another
  • There is a reliance on parents and carers providing transport to provision - 71% report they mostly get lifts from parents/carers
  • Young people generally hear about available provision through thier parents/carers or at school.

Providers

  • 64% of providers who responded beleive there is a good spread of short breaks across the area
  • 7 of 11 providers who responded charge for their sessions
  • 64% see play as a central feature when delivering provision  - showing creativity to their approach and flexible methods of working so that young people can take ownership of activities
  • Providers suggested there should be more provision offered to families in the school holidays, half terms and Christmas and highlighted a lack of provision for 18-25s to move onto in order to maintain existing social circles.
  • 45% of providers reported that they know of children who cannot access thier services - reasons include access to transport, sessions too short and activities not being adapted to special needs