Part of: Ill Health and Disability, Cancer

Related to: Digestive Cancers - Bowel (Colorectal) Cancer and Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Cancer Lung Cancer, Breast Cancer, Skin Cancer (Melanoma), Prostate Cancer, [[Aging Population]], Births and Fertility, Mental Health and Illness, [[Health Checks]], Major Causes of Mortality, Smoking, End of Life Care, Vaccine Preventable Infections

Key Facts:

  • Incidence of cervical cancer in Bath and North East Somerset in 2012 was 13.67 per 100,000 of the directly age-standardised (DSR) female population, this was higher than the South West and England. However, the incidence of cervical cancer has decreased overall in B&NES since 1995.
  • Mortality from cervical cancer in Bath and North East Somerset in 2013 was 2.23 per 100,000 of the directly age-standardised (DSR) female population, this was slightly lower than the South West and England. Mortality from cervical cancer has been decreasing overall in B&NES, the South West and England since 1995.
  • In March 2013 the percentage of 25-64 year olds screened less than 5 years since their last test was 80.1% in B&NES, 80.0% in the South West, and 78.3% in England.
  • In March 2014 the percentage of younger women 25-49 year olds screened less than 3.5 years since their last adequate test was 73.5% in B&NES, 74.2% in the South West, and 72.0% in England.

Cervical cancer is an uncommon type of cancer that develops in a woman’s cervix. The cervix is the entrance to the womb from the vagina. It's possible for women of all ages to develop cervical cancer. However, the condition mainly affects sexually active women between 25 and 45 years old. The condition is very rare in women under 25. Many women who are affected did not attend their screening appointments. 1

What does the data say? 2

Because of the success of the NHS screening programme, cervical cancer is now an uncommon type of cancer in the UK.

In 2012, 2,482 women were known to have cervical cancer in UK, and 267 women were known to have cervical cancer in the South West. 3

Incidence of cervical cancer in Bath and North East Somerset in 2012 was 13.67 per 100,000 of the directly age-standardised (DSR) female population, this was higher than the South West, which was 10.27 per 100,000, and England, which was 9.27 per 100,000. 4

Incidence of cervical cancer has decreased overall in B&NES and England since 1995, when it was 18.07 per 100,000 of the B&NES DSR female population, and 12.13 per 100,00 of the England DSR female population. 5

In 2013 the number of women who died of cervical cancer in the South West was 77 and in England it was 721. 6

Mortality from cervical cancer in Bath and North East Somerset in 2013 was 2.23 per 100,000 of the directly age-standardised (DSR) female population, this was slightly lower than the South West, which was 2.68 per 100,000, and England, which was 2.72 per 100,000. 7

Mortality from cervical cancer has been decreasing overall in B&NES, the South West and England since 1995, when it was 4.34 per 100,000 of the directly age-standardised (DSR) female population in B&NES,  5.0 in the South West, and 5.4 in England. 8

Are we meeting the needs?

Cervical screening

In March 2013 the percentage of 25-64 year olds screened less than 5 years since their last test was 80.1% in Bath and North East Somerset, 80.0% in the South West, and 78.3% in England. 9

In March 2014 the percentage of younger women 25-49 year olds screened less than 3.5 years since their last adequate test was 73.5% in B&NES, 74.2% in the South West, and 72.0% in England. 10

What can we realistically change?

B&NES Clinical Commissioning Groups Commissioning Intentions for the cancer programme for 2013/14 11

The Bath and North East Somerset Clinical Commissioning Groups developed a draft paper outlining their Intentions for the cancer programme for 2013/14; to be used in conjunction with the Cancer Mortality Report for Bath and North East Somerset (July 2012). This paper is a guide to prioritising commissioning of cancer services in the Bath and North East Somerset area. Its key objective is to improve cancer outcomes (including premature mortality and 1 and 5 year survival) through a targeted approach to cancer inequalities.

The changes to Bath and North East Somerset’s Screening Programme it outlines are:

  • Improve screening coverage (to maintain a 80% target)
  • Continue to monitor and support Human Papillomavirus (HPV) testing.

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidance