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Part of: Waste and Recycling

Related to: Household Waste Kerbside Collections, Air Quality, Biodiversity, Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation, Ecosystem Services, Green Infrastructure and Spaces

Key facts:

  • In 2013/14, 73% of waste collected from recycling centres in Bath and North East Somerset was diverted away from landfill (re-used, recycled or composted), representing a 4% increase compared to 2009/10
  • In 2010/11, 5 bring banks that were not being used very much were removed, significantly reducing the amount of glass and paper collected via bring banks.
  • In B&NES in 2013/14 the greatest proportion of waste collected from recycling centres that was diverted from landfill was rubble with 4,976 tonnes, followed by garden waste with 4,272 tonnes, and wood, with 3,282 tonnes.
  • 65% of Voicebox respondents rated local recycling centres as very good or good.

Where containers designed for the depositing of recyclable and re-usable materials are placed in sites not solely intended for the disposal of waste and recycling items these are referred to as bring banks. An example of these being recycling disposal containers placed outside shops or community centres. However, when these containers are located on a site dedicated to providing waste and recycling disposal facilities these containers then become part of a recycling centre.

What does the data say? 

Bring Banks

In recent years there has been a considerable decline in the amount of waste collected from bring banks, hence the reduction in the tonnes of waste from bring banks recycled, only 15 tonnes in 2013/14 (18 tonnes on average each year between 2011/12-2013/14), compared to 365 tonnes in 2007/08 (302 tonnes on average each year between 2007/08-2010/11) .  1  2

The significant decline in the amount of glass and paper collected was due to the fact that in 2010/11, 5 bring banks that were not being used very much were removed. 3 This is not an indication that people are not recycling as much in Bath and North East Somerset, but instead reflects the fact that the range of items collected from people’s houses to be recycled has been extended (see Household Waste Kerbside Collections ).

Figure 1: Makeup of waste collected from bring banks in Bath and North East Somerset that has been re-used, recycled or composted (2007/08-2013/14) 4  5

Recycling Centres

In Bath and North East Somerset the total waste collected from recycling centres in 2013/14 was 22,466 tonnes this reflects a 14% reduction in waste from recycling centres since 2007/08, when 25,975 tonnes were collected. 6 7  

In 2013/14, 16,421 tonnes of waste collected from recycling centres in Bath and North East Somerset was diverted away from landfill, and thus 73% of this waste was re-used, recovered, recycled or composted. This represents a 4% increase in the proportion of waste from recycling centres that that was diverted from landfill since 2007/08, when 69% of the waste collected was re-used, recovered, recycled or composted. 8

Click here to see the waste collected from recycling centres in Bath and North East Somerset - measured in tonnes

 

Figure 2: Waste collected from recycling centres in Bath and North East Somerset (2007/08-2013/14) – measured in tonnes 9 10 

  

Figure 3: Outcome of waste collected from recycling centres in Bath and North East Somerset (2007/08-2013/14) 11 12 

In 2013/14 the greatest proportion of waste collected from recycling centres that was diverted from landfill in terms of weight was rubble with 4,976 tonnes collected, followed by garden waste with 4,272 tonnes, and wood, with 3,282 tonnes. The amount of rubble collected has decreased by 6% since 2007/08 (5,272 tonnes), garden waste has decreased by 9% since 2007/08 (4,717 tonnes), and wood has decreased by 5% since 2007/08 (3,456 tonnes). 13 

 

Figure 4: Waste collected from recycling centres in Bath and North East Somerset that has been re-used, recovered, recycled, or composted (2007/08-2013/14) - (Part 1) - measured in tonnes  14 15 

  

Figure 5: Waste collected from recycling centres in Bath and North East Somerset that has been re-used, recovered, recycled, or composted (2007/08-2013/14) - (Part 2) - measured in tonnes 16 17 

*It is important to note that where the lines on Figures 4-5 do not cover the whole period 2007/08-2013/14, this reflects the introduction of new recycling collections, or the inclusion of waste types into new collections (such as the inclusion of plastic bottles in the new mixed plastic collection).

What does the community say?

Bath & North East Somerset Council appointed RMG:Clarity to carry out a large scale Resident Survey in 2012. The survey generated 850 responses representing views from across Bath & North East Somerset. The purpose of this survey was to provide an insight into the local community and to capture resident’s views on their local area and council services.

28% of respondents rated the local recycling centres as very good and 38% of respondents rating them as good (65% combined).18

Are we meeting the needs?  19

In 2013/14 there was a phased introduction of food waste collections at mini recycling centre sites.

In 2009/10 the recycling of plaster board was introduced at recycling centres.

In 2007/08 the recycling of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) was introduced at recycling centres.

What can we realistically change?

On the 14th July 2005, the Council considered and agreed our Waste Strategy, Towards Zero Waste 2020. An updated Action Plan is due to be published this year.

In August of 2005 the Planning Transportation & Economy Overview & Scrutiny panel reviewed waste & recycling services and made some recommendations linked to bring banks and recycling centres: 20 

Another Waste Strategy is due to be published this year (2015). One of the issues this strategy hopes to address is the growing number of households in the area, and thus the need  to continue our efforts to help householders reduce the amount of waste they produce to ensure that a downward trend is achieved.  21