Part of: Community Area Profiles

Other Community Area Profiles: Bath Area Profile, Keynsham Area Profile, Bathavon Area Profile, Somer Valley Area Profile

The following sections include specific reference to issues affecting the Chew Valley Area;

Related to: Green Infrastructure and Spaces, Water SafetyGP Practice Population, Pharmacies, Unintentional Injuries, StrokeChild PovertyDomestic Abuse Characteristics, Flooding, Rural Areas, Biodiversity, Cost of Living

Key Facts:

  • The Chew Valley Area has a usual resident* population of about 9,983.
  • Higher proportions of children than the B&NES average.
  • Higher proportions of people aged 65 years and over than the B&NES and England & Wales averages.
  • Higher proportions of self-employed people than the B&NES and England & Wales averages.
  • All except one ward in the Chew Valley Area have higher proportions of people with the highest qualification level than the B&NES average.
  • Higher proportions of homeowners than the B&NES and the England & Wales averages.
  • Lower proportions of people using public transport to get to work than the England & Wales average.
  • Lower recorded crime rates per 1,000 of the population than the B&NES average.
  • Chew Valley North is the only ward with higher recorded drug crime rates than the B&NES average.
  • All except one ward have lower rates of recorded thefts, robberies and burglaries per 1,000 of the population than the B&NES and the England & Wales averages.

A usual resident* - is anyone who, on census day, had stayed or intended to stay in the area for a period of 12 months or more, or had a permanent address the area and was outside it, but intended to be outside for less than 12 months. School children and students in full-time education studying away from their family home are treated as usually resident at their term-time address.1

The Chew Valley Area

The Chew Valley Area consists of four electoral wards and 14 parishes, 2 3 and has a usual resident population of about 9,983. 4 The Chew Valley lies to the west of Bath and North East Somerset, and has strong links to Bristol. It is a large rural area and identified as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. One of its key features is the Chew Valley Lake, an important site for wildlife which has been dedicated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest and a Special Protection Area.

Figure 1: Community areas map with parishes

The Chew Valley Community Area is made up of the following wards and parishes: 

Wards

Parishes

Chew Valley North

Cameley

Chew Valley South

Chew Magna

Clutton

Chew Stoke

Mendip

Clutton

 

Compton Martin

 

East Harptree

Hinton Blewett
Nempnett Trubwell 
Norton Malreward 
 Publow with Pensford
 Stanton Drew
 Stowey Sutton
 Ubley

West Harptree

What does the data say?

Census 2011 5

Data from the 2011 census has been analysed at ward level for the Chew Valley Area.

To view interactive charts for each census data theme, please use the drop-down selector box below;

Link to Tableau web-page hosting the Chew Valley Area census graphs 

Age and ethnicity

Child population (0-15 years) – In the Chew Valley Area in 2011, the Mendip ward had the highest child population (19.72%), and Chew Valley North the lowest (17.44%). The proportions of children in every ward in the Chew Valley Area were higher than the B&NES average (16.80%) . However, the proportion of children in England and Wales (18.87%) was slightly greater than in Chew Valley North and Chew Valley South wards.

Older and much older people population (65 years and over) Chew Valley North was the ward with the greatest proportion of people aged 65 and over (24.56%). The older people population of every ward in the Chew Valley Area was higher than the B&NES (18.08%) and England and Wales (16.45%) averages. With the Mendip ward having the lowest proportion of people aged 65 and over (18.78%).

Main language is not English – Throughout the wards in the Chew Valley Area the percentage of people whose main language was not English in 2011 (between 0.61-1.04%) was markedly below the average percentages in B&NES (4.34%) and England and Wales (7.74%).

Black and minority ethnic population – In the Chew Valley Area, the ward of Chew Valley South had the highest proportion of the Black and Minority Ethnic people (2.02%) , very closely followed by Mendip (2.01%).  However, compared to the averages of England & Wales (14.03%) and B&NES (5.42%) these percentages were very low.

Economy

Self-employed population – In 2011 every ward in the Chew Valley Area was far above the England & Wales (9.70%) and B&NES (10.96%) averages. Among all the wards in the area, Chew Valley North had the greatest proportion of self-employed people (20.37%) and the lowest percentage was in Chew Valley South (16.2%).

Unemployed population (16-74 years) – Throughout the Chew Valley Area the proportions of unemployed people were below the B&NES (2.72%) and England & Wales (4.38%) averages, with Chew Valley South being the ward with the highest percentage of unemployed people (2.33%).

Education

Full time students aged 18 and over (at term time address) – Throughout the Chew Valley Area the percentage of full time students aged 18 and over in 2011 was below the average percentages of England & Wales (4.43%) and B&NES (9.05%). There were only slight differences among the wards (1.69-2.05%), with Clutton (1.69%) being the ward with the lowest percentage and Chew Valley South (2.31%) being the ward with the highest percentage of full time students aged 18 and over.

High level of qualification – level 4+, equivalent to an undergraduate degree (16 years and over) – Among all the wards in the Chew Valley Area, in 2011 the proportion of those with high qualifications was above the England & Wales (27.22%) average. With Clutton (30.48%) being the only ward below the B&NES average (33.40%). By contrast, Chew Valley North (42.08%) was the ward with the greatest proportion of people with the high levels of qualification.

No Qualifications (16 years and over) – Possibly linked to the fact it was the ward with the greatest proportion of people with highest levels of qualification, Chew Valley North (16.14%) was the ward with the smallest proportion of non-qualified people. Chew Valley North was also the only ward which was below both the England & Wales (22.66%) and B&NES (17.17%) averages. With Mendip (20.38%) and Clutton (19.42%) being the wards with the greatest proportion of non-qualified people.

Health and society

Limiting long term illness – In 2011 the proportion of the population with a limiting long-term illness was below the England & Wales (17.92%) and B&NES (16.08%) averages in all of the wards in the Chew Valley Area. However, Mendip (15.62%) had the greatest proportion of limiting long-term illness. By contrast the smallest percentage was in Chew Valley South (14.18%).

Lone parent households: with dependent children – All the wards in the Chew Valley Area had a lower proportion of lone parent households with dependent children than the England & Wales (7.94%) and B&NES (6.19%) averages, with Chew Valley South having the highest percentage (5.88%). The ward with the lowest proportion was Chew Valley North (3.60%).

Carers – Each ward in the Chew Valley Area in 2011 had a higher proportion of carers than the B&NES (9.99%) and the England & Wales (10.30%) averages. The greatest proportion of carers was in Clutton (12.8%) and the lowest in Mendip (10.60%).

Housing

Housing tenure – owned – Across the wards in the Chew Valley Area the proportion of homeowners varied only a bit in 2011. All the wards were above the England & Wales (64.33%) and the B&NES (67.25%) averages, with Chew Valley North (80.93%) being the ward with the greatest proportion. In contrast, Mendip (77.29%) had the lowest proportion.

Housing tenure privately rented – The proportion of privately rented housing in 2011 was very low across all the wards in the Chew Valley Area, lower than the B&NES (16.93%) and England & Wales (16.69%) averages. The highest percentage was in Chew Valley North (9.64%) and the lowest in Clutton (7.90%).

Housing tenure – socially rented Throughout the Chew Valley Area the proportion of socially rented houses was below the B&NES (14.44%) and the England & Wales (17.63%) averages. The highest percentage was in Mendip (11.64%) In contrast, Chew Valley North (7.94%) had the lowest percentage of socially rented houses.

Transport

No cars or vans in household Among the wards in the Chew Valley Area, in 2011 the proportion of households with no cars was extremely low. Chew Valley North (7.10%), being the ward with the greatest proportion, was far below the B&NES (21.98%) and England & Wales (25.63%) averages. The ward with the lowest proportion was Clutton (6.44%). 

People who travel to work by public transport – In 2011 all the wards in the Chew Valley Area the rates were below the B&NES (10.19) and England & Wales (16.40%) averages. Interestingly, Chew Valley South, which had a comparatively high proportion of households with no car, had the least proportion of people traveling to work by public transport (2.16%). By contrast, Mendip (4.07%) had the highest percentage.

Crime data 2014 6

Recorded crime rates per 1,000 of the population for the Chew Valley Area at ward level for January 2014 to December 2014.

To view interactive charts for each crime type, please use the drop-down selector box below;

Link to Tableau web-page hosting the Chew Valley Area crime graphs.

Crime

All crime – All the wards in the Chew Valley Area had a lower recorded crime rate per 1,000 of the population in 2014 than the B&NES average (67.87 per 1,000). The ward with the highest overall recorded crime rate per 1,000 of the population was Chew Valley North (40.07 per 1,000). In contrast, Mendip (22.37 per 1,000) had the lowest recorded crime rate.

ASB and public order offences The highest rate of recorded ASB and public order offences in the Chew Valley Area in 2014 was in Chew Valley South (23.75 per 1,000). Again, all the wards had lower rates of recorded ASB and public order offences than the B&NES average (31.42 per 1,000). Mendip was the ward with the lowest rate (6.6 per 1,000), followed by Chew Valley North (10.02 per 1,000) and Clutton (10.95 per 1,000).

Criminal damage and arson – As with the average rate in B&NES overall (5.81 per 1,000), rates of recorded criminal damage and arson were low throughout the wards in the Chew Valley Area  in 2014. The ward in the Chew Valley Area with the highest rates of recorded criminal damage and arson per 1,000 of the population in 2014 was Clutton (2.35 per 1,000 residents). The lowest rates of recorded criminal damage and arson were in Chew Valley North (1.25 per 1,000) and Chew Valley South (1.25 per 1,000).

Drug crimes – The very low rates of recorded drug crimes throughout the Chew Valley Area wards in 2014 reflects the very low B&NES average (1.91 per 1,000). There was only one ward in the Chew Valley Area that was slightly above the B&NES average, Clutton (1.95 per 1,000). There were no drug crimes recorded for the Chew Valley South ward in 2014.

Thefts, robberies and burglaries – The ward in the Chew Valley Area with the highest rate of recorded thefts, robberies and burglaries per 1,000 of the population in 2014 was Chew Valley North (22.54 per 1,000). This was the only ward to have a higher rate than the B&NES average (16.99 per 1,000). The lowest rate of thefts, robberies and burglaries were in:

  • Clutton (7.04 per 1,000)
  • Chew Valley South (7.08 per 1,000)
  • Mendip (8.07 per 1,000).

Violence and sexual offences – The highest rates of recorded violence and sexual offences in the Chew Valley Area in 2014 were in Clutton (4.30 per 1,000) and Chew Valley North (3.54 per 1,000). However the B&NES average was more than twice as high (8.87 per 1,000 residents). Mendip was the ward with the lowest rate (2.20 per 1,000) closely followed by Chew Valley South (2.50 per 1,000).

Local assets and services

Education

There is one secondary school, Chew Valley, which has 1200 pupils including 200 in the Sixth Form.  Many of the student travel from bordering areas such as Bristol. The school site also accommodates the leisure centre and a children’s centre. There are eight primary schools in the area, seven are run by the Local Authority and one, Chew Stoke, is an Academy. 7

Health and wellbeing

Figure 2: GP Practice Boundaries - Harptree and Cameley 

(Click here to see a larger image of Figure 2)

Recently the GP surgery in Chew Magna relocated to a nearby village Chew Stoke. Other GP surgeries are located in West Harptree and Temple Cloud.  8 9

A number of the larger villages have retained their local pub and convenience stores with some provision for post office services, and a supply of library books being part of the ‘Hub in the Pub’ in Chew Stoke.  All villages have a church room, village or community facility, which vary in size and are used by a range of clubs and groups on a regular basis. The mobile library service also operates once a week in the area.  Chew Magna acts as a local service hub to the surrounding villages. 10

Deprivation

There is very little deprivation in the Chew Valley area. All wards are within the least deprived 30% nationally and Chew Valley South falls within the least deprived 10%. 11

Housing

Housing growth in the Chew Valley over the next 20 years will be limited and any new development will be focussed on villages outside the Green Belt that have a wide range of local facilities and public transport. The Core Strategy 12 makes provision for the larger villages outside the Green Belt to identify development sites to accommodate around 50 dwellings, with small villages outside the Green Belt with a more limited range of services/facilities identifying sites to accommodate around 10 to 15 dwellings within the plan period. For those villages within and ‘washed over’ by the Green Belt new housing provision is limited to small scale infill development or limited affordable housing to meet local community needs. 

Transport

Poor public transport provision means that the population is very reliant on private transport. The need for Community Transport has continued to increase particularly for health related appointments and social activities. 13 14

Community Engagement

Much of the volunteering in the Chew Valley is informal volunteering helping neighbours and caring for relatives. There are residents who are involved in community activities, such as:

  • lunch clubs
  • local flood wardens
  • the hub in a pub
  • community car scheme.

However with an aging population the available ‘volunteer pool’ is likely to reduce and the need for health-related services and adequate transport provision will increase further. 15

Difficulties in accessing local services

Whilst many of the villages have some services for the local community to access these are widely spread. Coupled with the lack of public transport in the rural area, accessing doctor’s surgeries, schools, shops and post offices requires most people to travel by private transport, either by car or taxi.  The increased costs of accessing services together with the increased costs of housing has led to rural living becoming less and less affordable, and for some completely unaffordable. This is particularly a problem for older people, families with young children and young people. 16

Public Finances

A breakdown of how Council Tax is spent including the charges for the Police and Fire services, the Environment Agency levy for flood protection, and the Town & Parish Council precepts can be found at - Your Guide To local Council spending and Council Tax 2015 - 2016.

Surveys and Consultations

Health and wellbeing consultations and engagement events run by Bath and North Somerset Council in partnership with the Bath and North East Somerset Clinical Commissioning Group - http://www.yourcareyourway.org/get-involved  

Priorities defined by the Chew Valley Area Forum  17

The Forum has identified a number of priorities that are of particular concern to the area which are set out below under eight common themes.  The Forum recognises that work is already underway in some areas to address these issues, such as Neighbourhood plan, Placemaking, Flood Forum etc.  However there are three areas where the biggest impact is being felt by the community, these are:-

Health and wellbeing

Improve access to services by offering more accessible ways to deliver services recognising the challenges of rural life and reducing inequality, isolation and loneliness.

Click here to see the priorities the Patient Participation Group of the Chew Surgery has defined.

Transport provision

Increase the health and wellbeing of those more isolated by considering alternative methods to public transport.

Improve connections to the main public transport routes for commuters.

Provide safer routes for cycling and walking.

Economic development and enterprise

Support rural businesses to thrive.

Improve the access to broadband for rural businesses.

The Forum will regularly review its eight themes in order to respond to new challenges and changing circumstances.  Their other priorities include:-

Children and young people

Improve the provision of services and facilities for young people.

Developments and infrastructure

Ensure the impact of development maintains the identity of villages and provides sufficient improvements to infrastructure such as schools, roads, traffic and health.

Improve the availability of affordable housing for local people.

Environmental, sustainability and climate change

Maintain awareness of the threat of Fracking in the local community.

Reduce the impact of flooding by working in partnership with agencies and the community to identify prevention measures and maintenance.

Stronger communities

Ensure community facilities are accessible and affordable to the whole community.

Safer communities

Provide a safe community by reducing anti-social behaviour.