Part of: Community Area Profiles

Other Community Area Profiles: Keynsham Area ProfileChew Valley Area Profile, Somer Valley Area Profile, Bathavon Area Profile

Our local needs assessment contains a number of issues which are of relevance to the Bath Area:

Related to: Cultural Activities, Tourism and the Visitor Economy, Cost of Living, StudentsGreen Infrastructure and Spaces, Water Safety, Air Quality, Historic Air Quality on London Road, Respiratory Infections, Sexual Health, Road Traffic Collisions, GP Practice Population, Pharmacies, Child Poverty, Night Time Economy, Alcohol and Community Safety, Police Assessments, Domestic Abuse Characteristics, Hate Crime and Hate Incidents, Service Use and Quality of Care

Key Facts:

  • The Bath Area has a usual resident population* of about 88,859.
  • The highest proportions of chidren aged 0-15 years are in the wards of Twerton and Combe Down.
  • Bathwick is the only ward with a higher proportion of black and minority ethnic people than the England & Wales average, this maybe due to the fact that the University of Bath is located in this ward.
  • Twerton has by far the greatest levels of unemployement in the Bath Area, and is the only ward to have a higher level than the England & Wales average.
  • Over a quarter of the populations of Bathwick, Westmoreland, Oldfield, and Widcombe wards are full time students aged 18 and over.
  • Over half the residents (16 years and over) in Lansdown, Abbey, Lyncombe, and Walcot  wards have High levels of qualifications (level 4+, equivalent to an undergraduate degree).
  • The majority of the Bath Area wards have a higher proportion of privately rented homes than the B&NES and England & Wales averages.
  • Twerton ward has by far the highest percentage of households living in socially rented homes in the Bath Area.
  • The majority of the wards in the Bath Area have a higher proportion of households with no vehicles than the B&NES and England & Wales averages. 
  • The wards in the Bath Area with the highest overall recorded crime rates are Abbey and Kingsmead, and the lowest rates are in Bathwick.

A usual resident* - is anyone who, on census day, had stayed or intended to stay in the area for a period of 12 months or more, or had a permanent address the area and was outside it, but intended to be outside for less than 12 months. School children and students in full-time education studying away from their family home are treated as usually resident at their term-time address.1 

The Bath Area

The Bath Area consists of sixteen electoral wards. Unlike North East Somerset, the Bath Area does not have parishes or parish councils. 2 3 It has a usual resident population* of 88,859. 4  It lies 12 miles south-east of Bristol, near the southern edge of the Cotswolds, in a valley of the River Avon, designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. One of Bath's principal industries is tourism, with more than 1 million staying visitors and 3.8 million day visitors per year. This is helped by the city's selection in 1987 as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, which recognised its international cultural significance. 5 All significant stages of English history are represented within the city, from the Roman Baths to Bath Abbey and the Royal Crescent, to the modern Thermae Bath Spa. The size of the tourist industry is reflected in the almost 300 places of accommodation, including over 80 hotels, over 180 bed and breakfasts, and 2Bath also has two universities and a large service sector, information and communication technology and creative industries.

Figure 1: Bath Area map with wards

The Bath Area is made up of the following wards:

What does the data say?

Census 2011 6

Data from the 2011 census has been analysed at ward level for the Bath Area.

To view interactive charts for each census data theme, please use the drop-down selector box below;

Link to Tableau web-page hosting the Bath Area census graphs

Age and ethnicity

Child population (0-15 years) – The wards of Twerton (21.37%) and Combe Down (20.19%) had the highest proportion of chidren aged 0-15 years in the Bath Area in 2011.  Four of the sixteen wards in the Bath Area had a higher proportion of children than the England & Wales average (18.87%), and eight wards had a higher proportion than the B&NES average (16.80%).  The wards of Abbey (6.12%) and Bathwick (7.36%) had the lowest proportion of chidren aged 0-15 years in the Bath Area in 2011.

Older and much older people population (65 years and over)  The wards of Weston (24.04%), Combe Down (19.76%), and Lyncombe (19.47%) had the highest proportion of older people aged 65 years and over in the Bath Area in 2011, and were the only three wards to have a higher proportion than the B&NES average (18.08%).  Nine of the sixteen wards in the Bath Area had a higher proportion of older people than the England & Wales average (16.45%).  Walcot (10.91%) and Westmoreland (11.13%) had the lowest proportion of older people aged 65 years and over in the Bath Area in 2011.

 

Main language is not English – The wards of Bathwick (14.23%) and Abbey (14.10%) had the highest proportion of people whose main language was not English in the Bath Area in 2011.  Five of the sixteen wards in the Bath Area had a higher proportion of people whose main language was not English than the England & Wales average (7.74%). Only four wards had a lower proportion of people whose main language was not English than the B&NES average (4.34%), with the Lambridge (2.81%) and Southdown (3.56%) being the wards with the lowest proportions in the Bath Area in 2011.

 

Black and minority ethnic population – In the Bath Area only Bathwick (14.70%) had a higher proportion of black and minority ethnic people in 2011 than the England & Wales average (14.03%). However, only two of the wards, Lyncombe (4.21%) and Lambridge (5.32%) had a lower proportion of black and minority ethnic people than the B&NES average (5.42%). 

 

Economy

Self-employed population – In the Bath Area the wards with the highest proportion of self-employed people in 2011 were Lansdown (14.10%) and Lambridge (14.0%), five of the sixteen wards had higher percentages compared to the B&NES average (10.96%).  The wards with the lowest proportion of self-employed people were Westmoreland (5.80%), and Twerton (5.82%), five of the sixteen wards had lower percentages compared to the England & Wales average (9.70%).

Unemployed population (16-74 years) – By far the greatest proportion of unemployed people in the Bath Area in 2011 lived in Twerton (6.29%), this was the only ward to have a higher proportion of unemployed people than the England & Wales average (4.38%).  Severn wards were over the B&NES average (2.72%). The wards with the lowest proportion of unemployed people were Bathwick (0.70%), and Westmoreland (1.8%). Bathwick may have the lowest proportion of unemployed people because of its large student population.

Education

Full time students aged 18 and over (at term time address) –There was huge variation in the proportion of full time students aged 18 and over in the Bath Area wards in 2011.  Over half the proportion (51.06%) of people residing in Bathwick in 2011 were full time students aged 18 and over, followed by other wards with very high proportions of students, Westmoreland (37.93%), Oldfied (27.18%), and Widcombe (26.59%).  Half of the sixteen wards in the Bath Area had a higher proportion of full time students aged 18 and over than the B&NES average (9.05%) . Only two wards had a lower proportion of full time students aged 18 and over than the England & Wales average (4.43%), Lambridge (3.38%) and Weston (3.89%).

High level of qualification – level 4+, equivalent to an undergraduate degree (16 years and over) – Among the wards in the Bath Area in 2011, the proportion of those with high qualifications varied greatly. Over half the residents (16 years and over) in four of the wards had a high level of qualification:

  • Lansdown (53.42%)
  • Abbey (51.19%)
  • Lyncombe (50.75%)
  • Walcot (50.12%).

Ten of the sixteen wards had a higher proportion of people aged 16 years and over with a high level of qualification than the B&NES average (33.40%). Only four of the wards in the Bath Area Area had a lower proportion of people (16 years and over) with a high level of qualification than the England & Wales average (27.22%). The wards with the lowest proportions were in Twerton (15.41%) and Southdown (20.93%).

No Qualifications (16 years and over) –  In 2011 only two out of the sixteen wards in the Bath Area had higher proportions of people (16 years and over) with no qualifications than the England & Wales average (22.66%), Twerton (31.73%) and Southdown (25.42%). Only four of the wards had higher proportions of people (16 years and over) with no qualifications than the B&NES average (17.17%).  Bathwick (5.77%), Widcombe (6.41%), and Lansdown (6.43%) wards had the lowest proportions of people (16 years and over) with no qualifications in the Bath Area in 2011. 

Health and society

Limiting long term illness – In 2011 five wards in the Bath Area had a higher proportion of the population with a limiting long-term illness than the B&NES (16.08%) and England & Wales averages (17.92%):

  • Twerton (20.92%)
  • Weston (18.97%)
  • Abbey (18.80%)
  • Southdown (18.39%)
  • Combe Down (18.32%). 

By contrast the smallest percentage was in Widcombe (10.07%).

Lone parent households: with dependent children – Four wards in the Bath Area in 2011 had a higher proportion of lone parent households with dependent children than the England & Wales average (7.94%):

  • Twerton (15.40%)
  • Odd Down (9.14%)
  • Combe Down (8.98%)
  • Southdown (8.98%).

Severn of the wards had a higher proportion of lone parent households with dependent children than the B&NES average (6.19%). The wards with the lowest proportions were Abbey (2.22%) and Bathwick (2.97%).

Carers – Five wards in the Bath Area in 2011 had a higher proportion of carers than the England & Wales average (10.30%):

  • Southdown (11.20%)
  • Lyncombe (11.10%)
  • Combe Down (10.90%)
  • Odd Down (10.70%)
  • Weston (10.50%).

Six wards had a higher proportion of carers than the B&NES (9.99%) average. The lowest proportion of carers was in Bathwick (6.21%), closely followed by Westmoreland (6.30%).

Housing

Housing tenure – owned – Across the wards in the Bath Area the proportion of owned houses varied a lot in 2011. Four of the sixteen wards: Bathwick (80.20%), Lyncombe (77.28%), Weston (70.86%), and Lambridge (69.78%) had higher proportions of owned homes than the B&NES average (67.25%). Severn of the wards had a higher proportion of owned houses than the England & Wales average (64.33%). In contrast, Abbey (30.26%) had the lowest proportion of owned homes in the Bath Area.

Housing tenure – privately rented – Though the proportion of households in privately rented housing in the Bath Area wards varied a great deal in 2011, over half (10) of the sixteen wards had a higher proportion than the B&NES (16.93%) and England & Wales (16.69%) averages.   The wards with the highest proportion of privately rented houses were:

  • Abbey (46.51%)
  • Kingsmead (37.47%)
  • Widcombe (35.00%)
  • Westmoreland (33.57%).  

In contrast to these very high proportions, there were six wards where less than 15% of homes were privately rented, the lowest proportions being in Twerton (9.19%) and Southdown (10.18%). 

Housing tenure – socially rented – Throughout the Bath Area in 2011 the proportion of households living in socially rented houses also varied a lot by ward. By far the highest percentage was in Twerton (48.31%), followed by Combe Down (26.97%)  Severn wards had higher proportions of socially rented homes than the England & Wales (17.63%) average, and nine wards had higher proportions than the B&NES (14.44%) average.  Bathwick (1.53%) and Widcombe (5.85%) had the lowest percentage of socially rented houses.

Transport

No cars or vans in household – The majority of the sixteen wards (12,11) in the Bath Area in 2011 had a higher proportion of households with no vehicles than the B&NES (21.98%) and England & Wales (25.63%) averages.  The wards with the highest proportions of households with no vehicles were Abbey (51.52%), Twerton (41.53%), and Kingsmead (41.41%). The ward with the lowest proportion of households with no vehicles was Lyncombe (16.25%).

People who travel to work by public transport –The wards in the Bath Area in 2011 with the highest proportions of people who travelled to work by public transport were Bathwick (18.48%) and Abbey (17.50%), these were the only two wards to have higher proportions than the England & Wales average (16.40%). Lambridge (9.95%) was the ward with the lowest proportion of people who travelled to work by public transport, and the only ward in the Bath Area to have a lower proportion than the B&NES average (10.19%). 

Crime data 2014 7

Recorded crime rates per 1,000 of the population for the Bath Area at ward level for January 2014 to December 2014.

To view interactive charts for each crime type, please use the drop-down selector box below;

Link to Tableau web-page hosting the Bath Area crime graphs.

Crime

All crime – The wards in the Bath Area with the highest overall recorded crime rates per 1,000 of the population in 2014 were Abbey (242.95 per 1,000), and Kingsmead (191.27 per 1,000). It is unsurprising that these wards had the highest rates because they cover Bath city centre. Five of the sixteen wards had a higher recorded crime rate than the B&NES average (67.87 per 1,000). The wards that had the lowest recorded crime rates were Bathwick (30.96 per 1,000) and Weston (31.02 per 1,000).

ASB and public order offences – The highest rates of recorded ASB and public order offences in the Bath Area in 2014 were also in Abbey (119.52 per 1,000) and Kingsmead (102.73 per 1,000). Again, this will be linked to the fact that these cover the city centre. There were six wards that had higher rates of recorded ASB and public order offences than the B&NES average (31.42 per 1,000). Lambridge was the ward with the lowest rate (13.19 per 1,000), followed by Weston (14.33 per 1,000) and Bathwick (16.49 per 1,000).

Criminal damage and arson –  The wards in the Bath Area with the highest rates of recorded criminal damage and arson per 1,000 of the population in 2014 were:

  • Twerton (18.18 per 1,000)
  • Kingsmead (12.42 per 1,000)
  • Abbey (12.03 per 1,000).

There were seven wards with rates higher than the B&NES average (5.82 per 1,000). The lowest rate of recorded criminal damage and arson was in Bathwick (1.41 per 1,000). 

Drug crimes – The very low rates of recorded drug crimes throughout the Bath Area wards in 2014 reflect the very low B&NES average (1.91 per 1,000). Only four of the sixteen wards in the Bath Area had higher rates than the B&NES average:

  • Abbey (3.61 per 1,000)
  • Twerton (3.09 per 1,000)
  • Kingsmead (2.48 per 1,000)
  • Southdown (1.96 per 1,000).

The wards with the lowest levels of recorded drug crimes were Lambridge (0.18 per 1,000), Oldfield (0.48 per 1,000), and Newbridge (0.51 per 1,000). 

Thefts, robberies and burglaries – The wards in the Bath Area with the highest rates of recorded thefts, robberies and burglaries per 1,000 of the population in 2014 were:

  • Abbey (78.85 per 1,000)
  • Kingsmead (47.37 per 1,000)
  • Widcombe (27.32 per 1,000)
  • Twerton (18.54 per 1,000). 

These were the only four wards to have higher rates than the B&NES average (16.99 per 1,000). The lowest rates of thefts, robberies and burglaries were in Weston (5.08 per 1,000), Westmoreland (6.81 per 1,000), and Odd Down (7.01 per 1,000).

Violence and sexual offences – The highest rates of recorded violence and sexual offences in the Bath Area in 2014 were in Abbey (26.91 per 1,000), closely followed by Twerton (25.08 per 1,000), and Kingsmead (21.65 per 1,000).  Seven wards in the Bath Area had higher rates of recorded violence and sexual offences of than the B&NES average (8.82 per 1,000). Bathwick was the ward with the lowest rate (2.01 per 1,000).

Local assets and services

Education

There are 24 infant/junior/primary schools, 2 of which are fee-paying.  There are 11 secondary schools serving the area; 5 of which are Academies and 2 are fee-paying.  In addition, there are 2 special schools and 1 studio school.  8 Bath Community Academy accommodates the Local Authority’s Leisure Centre at Rush Hill.

In terms of Further Education, there is the City of Bath College and for Higher Education, the University of Bath and Norland College – a nationally recognised provider of childcare training and education.  Bath Spa University has its main campus in Newton St Loe, which is in the Bathavon Area Forum but has a number of satellite sites in the city as well as residential accommodation for students.

Health and Wellbeing

There are 14 GPs surgeries across the area and a medical centre at the University of Bath. 9 The area is also home to the Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust, which provides acute treatment and care for a catchment population of around 500,000 people in Bath and the surrounding towns and villages in North East Somerset and Western Wiltshire.  The Trust occupies a 52-acre site about 1½ miles from Bath city centre. 10

There are Local Authority Leisure Centres in the City Centre and at Rush Hill as well as a number of privately run facilities.  The Sports Training Village at the University of Bath is open to members of the public as well as the home of Team Bath – the University’s elite athletes11  12

The area is also well served in terms of public open space, from the formal parks near the City Centre to smaller play facilities in outlying residential areas. 13

In terms of libraries, as well as the Bath Central Library, there are smaller libraries at Moorland Road and Weston, and Community Libraries at Larkhall and Southside (Whiteway).  There is also a mobile library service to Foxhill; Combe Down; Odd Down and Newbridge. 14

Deprivation

5 neighbourhoods (lower level super output areas) in Bath are within the 20% most deprived in England15;

  • Twerton West
  • Whiteway
  • Twerton
  • Fox Hill North
  • Whiteway West

These communities experience a range of poorer outcomes compared to the wider population. For more information see Deprivation

For example, the route of the 20c bus shows the difference in life expectancy for men16;

Transport

Historically the River Avon was used as a transport corridor, now the A4 from Bath to Bristol provides the principle vehicular route for the area. Park and Ride schemes have been introduced, with sites at Odd Down, Lansdown and Newbridge.  Bath has a network of bus routes with services to surrounding towns and cities and rail links with regular connections to cities such as London, Bristol, Cardiff, Exeter, Plymouth, Salisbury, Southampton, and Portsmouth.  It is also on National Cycle Route 4, with one of Britain's first cycleways, the Bristol & Bath Railway Path, to the west, and an eastern route toward London on the canal towpath.The route of the former Somerset and Dorset Railway within Bath has been reused for the Two Tunnels Greenway, a shared use path that links into the National Cycle Network and local paths with routes to Radstock (Route 24 Colliers Way) and the Bristol to Bath walking and cycling route in the west (Route 4). 17

Community Engagement

The community is very active with high levels of volunteering and community organisations providing a range of opportunities including historical societies, sports clubs, gardening clubs, allotments, litter picking, environment groups, lunch clubs, community resources and support and advice groups.  18 The Volunteer Centre Bath & North East Somerset is based in central Bath and provides a service in promoting volunteering opportunities and identifying suitable candidates for local charities and community organisations. 19 

In addition to community organised events, as a major tourist destination, Bath is home to a large number of professionally organised festivals and sporting fixtures annually.  Many of these have a community engagement element to them. 20

A Student Community Partnership has been established in to promote two-way relationships between Higher Education students and members of the local community across Bath.  Over 2,400 students between the two Universities are involved in volunteering annually. Some of this includes working with the local community on one day events, medium and longer term projects as well as fundraising for local charities and organisations. 21 


Finances

A breakdown of how Council Tax is spent including the charges for the Police and Fire services, the Environment Agency levy for flood protection, and the Town & Parish Council precepts can be found at - Your Guide To local Council spending and Council Tax 2015 - 2016.

Surveys and Consultations

Health and wellbeing consultations and engagement events run by Bath and North Somerset Council in partnership with the Bath and North East Somerset Clinical Commissioning Group - http://www.yourcareyourway.org/get-involved